Tag Archives: lift10

La blogueuse et les conférences

[en] I write a weekly column for Les Quotidiennes, which I republish here on CTTS for safekeeping.

Chroniques du monde connecté: cet article a été initialement publié dans Les Quotidiennes (voir l’original).

Les conférences, c’est l’occasion idéale de créer des contacts et de renforcer les liens existants. Et si l’on a la chance d’avoir un blog, c’est doublement l’occasion de le faire.

En 2004, j’assiste à ma première conférence “de geeks” (à l’époque, c’est clairement ce qu’on était, nous les blogueurs). Fraîchement sortie des études (elles ont été longues!), il m’est difficilement concevable d’écouter un orateur sans prendre des notes. Blogueuse depuis plusieurs années, il m’est difficilement concevable de prendre des notes sans les publier. Ça deviendra une habitude par la suite: je prends des notes aux conférences auxquelles j’assiste, et je les publie sur mon blog.

Pourquoi est-ce que je vous raconte ça? Parce que je me suis rendu compte, au détour d’une conversation ou deux avec d’anciens et nouveaux participants à la conférence Lift en fin de semaine dernière, à quel point c’est mon activité de blogueuse au fil des conférences qui a servi de catalyseur (voire de détonateur!) dans la construction de mon réseau. (Je n’aime pas trop le mot “construction” ici, qui donne l’impression d’une démarche délibérée alors que c’est plutôt un processus organique qui se fait un peu tout seul, mais faute de mieux…)

En me positionnant comme “celle qui prend des notes et les publie sur son blog”, j’initie des contacts tant avec les autres participants que les orateurs — ou même les organisateurs de la conférence. On pourrait dire que c’est la recette “faites quelque chose qui ait de la valeur pour la communauté, et elle vous en sera reconnaissante”.

Je ne sais pas comment c’est pour vous, mais pour ma part, si je me retrouve dans une salle pleine de personnes et que je n’en connais aucune, je trouve très difficile de faire connaissance avec les gens autour de moi (à plus forte raison si ces personnes se connaissent déjà). Par contre, si je connais une ou deux personnes pour commencer, ça aide énormément. Bloguer est un excellent moyen de provoquer ces quelques premiers contacts qui mèneront plus loin.

Bien entendu, plus on fait ça de façon désintéressée, et mieux ça marche. C’est d’ailleurs comme ça avec plus ou moins tout ce qui touche au réseautage et aux médias sociaux.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Chroniques du monde connecté | Tagged conference, lift10, live-blogging, réseautage | 3 Comments

Lift10: Printing the internet out (Russell Davies)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is Printing the internet out (Russell Davies). May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

Most of what follows is true. steph-note: he has Kinder Surprise as prizes, just threw one to a member of the audience!

Lift10 Russell Davies

Has worked in advertising for a long time. Realized after a while he wanted to be at the front of the train because it was less crowded. But being at the front of the train is being at the back of a whole lot of other trains.

Exploring the recently possible. But what we actually do is explore the recently easy. People don’t realise when something becomes easy! Big gap. steph-note: I’m in there ;-)

Screens.

Book “The Comfort of Things” (Daniel Miller)

Objects are more than just a screen. Big red remote button (made by @tinkerlondon) instead of tinier and tinier keynote remotes.

Lift10 Big Red Remote Button

Brilliant post: The street as platform. Terribly long, you realize how long when you print it.

“Things our friends have written on the internet” (2008). Newspaper Club.

There are brilliant bits of infrastructure lying around (printing presses) and they’re not used as much, so easy access.

“We have broken your business, now we want your machines.”

Trying to imagine what houses would be like in 2050, based on model houses. shows photos Speculative modelling.

We shouldn’t forget about analogue friction.

Russell loves pockets. We build book-sized things really well, but not objects the size of a chestnut. Poken! (on screen!)

Data about who you are => manufacturing process => make something you can put in a kinder egg => you get extra points.

Project: look at the software you use over time (like RescueTime) and then send you building blocks representing it :-) Making visible and material something we have trouble grasping (how much time we spend in these things).

Christmas decorations based on people’s social media use. Dopplr clouds, Twitter snowmen, Last.FM bars, etc :-) steph-note: I want a Twitter snowman!

Physical transformations are even more indistinguishable from magic. Turning something from the data world into something physical. The mix tape. Much better on cassette than just sending a playlist. Because it’s a physical object. Personal objects are really powerful — and people are really used to paying for objects.

Printing wikipedia!!!

Lift10 Russell Davies Thanks

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | 2 Comments

Lift10: How to win in digital (Richard Murton)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is How to win in digital (Richard Murton). May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

As an ex-RAF pilot, more used to speaking to one person (air traffic controler) when he has an earpiece strapped in.

Lift10 Richard Murton

Big organizations have many questions about what they should do with the digital world. => accenture

Go through some of the key challenges big organizations are facing to tackle the digital world, and the 5 key things they can do right.

Context. Life was simple before, all you needed was a website, a bit of search, and a few banner adverts — that was a digital strategy.

Now… it’s a really complex jungle out there.

Outbound marketing vs. surround marketing. More of the latter now. Capture the attention of all the consumers out there.

Traditional channels are increasingly digitized. Ex. billboard changed into super-screen billboard.

The consumer is everywhere, in control, and has different attitudes and actions from before.

Average 10-30% invested in digital.

Challenges. Some quotes:

  • relevance “we are not winning the battle for customer relevance in digital” — lots of the visitors of websites are anonymous => hard to provide them with a relevant experience (“hi Joe, same beer as usual?”) The winning companies are creating intimacy out of anonymity.
  • “even small site changes wait for up to 10 different stakeholders approvals” — can’t spend 6 months with your agency planning and 3 months building etc for your website. A two-year cycle is way too long!
  • home-grown platforms — stitched together isn’t going to serve you very well if you want to provide your customers with a sleep agile environment
  • “technology spend as a proportion of digital revenue is out of control”
  • “web reporting and measurement is its own little island… it’s not connected” — internet: very measurable, we just need to figure how, and how to use it

Success:

1 Place analytics at the core of your digital marketing campaign and business, and intelligence to see what solution actually drives the outcome you want (real-life testing); content at the asset level, measure success of variations.

If you don’t know who your customers are you can use simple techniques like reverse IP lookup to know where they’re from, etc… => can already give you some insight (ex. urban vs rural areas, etc), or use the search term they used (do they know the brand? is the search sophisticated?) Possible to use info gathered in social network sites to target advertising to customers when they finally come to your site (e.g. Jack was asking around about plasma screens)

2 Moving to single integrated platforms. Cost, security.

3 Vertically extending into advertising. We think only 14% of ads we see are relevant to us. Lot of space for optimization!

4 Horizontally extending into online and offline worlds (Holy Grail).

5 Managed services to create digital campaigns. steph-note: not sure I understand what a managed service is

Future is agile, flexible, scalable and uses analytics as a foundation.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | Leave a comment

Lift10: Technology and Cultural Difference in China (Basile Zimmermann)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is Technology and Cultural Difference in China (Basile Zimmermann). May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

Quick overview of Basil’s work at UNIGE Dept. of Chinese Studies.

Lift10 Cultural differences in China 3

A cultural difference: language. What happens when this kind of difference meets technology? Encoding issues. steph-note: don’t I know it! With Chinese, disastrous!

Lift10 Cultural differences in China 2

This is related to production history. English-speaking users first, then others came along. “ASCII” = American Standard Code for Information Interchange.

Keyboards in China look just like ours, but how on earth do they manage? Most common method: they type phonetically and then choose amongst a selection of homophones. Very quick, with autocompletion. But the problem is that afterwards Chinese people forget how to write by hand (they forget the precise strokes).

The Google logo on the Chinese web. Localized Chinese versions are usually not very Chinese. How do you think they feel about it?

Lift10 Cultural differences in China 4

Lift10 Cultural differences in China 5

Lift10 Cultural differences in China 6

Lift10 Cultural differences in China 7

Cf. List of unequal treaties. Everyone in China knows about these. Used to others taking advantages. Pay attention to this if you want to do business in China.

Successful social network in China, Kaixinwang.

Difference with Facebook: FB has two views, your profile, and info about your friends (newsfeed). Very strict policy about privacy (won’t reveal pages you view to other users on the site). Kaixinwang don’t do advertising posters on the main page, but design games with ad placement. (Design the games themselves.)

Virtual gifts. But some of the gifts are advertisements. Small applications, like a Smart car that you can play with, it grows bigger, and the skin changes.

Technology IS culture. The economy of China is growing really fast. What will technology look like the day it’s reinvented by the Chinese to fit their own needs?

Three things should happen:

  • language issues: technology is being developped *for* the Chinese language (already happening)
  • more abstract: computer technology is embedded with Western logic (good at chess! bad at go! really smart programmers are finding it impossible to write a programme that plays go well) — biggest user of the internet, government puts billions in new technologies, and to find out what is dangerous and what is not. Cf. Human Flesh Search (*steph-note: heard about this on On The Media.*)

Different way of looking at web pages in China. Also, they go online to have fun, whereas we tend to go online to work. Lots of gaming.

The Western media have a very black-and-white vision of China and its government. We talk a lot about censorship, but we have it here too. The Chinese government wants to make sure nothing bad happens. As an ISP you have to make certain that this or that type of content (considered harmful) is not made available.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | Leave a comment

Lift10: OhmyNews, the story and future of citizen journalism (Yeon-ho Oh)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is OhMyNews: the story and future of citizen journalism (Yeon-ho Oh). May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

Lift10 Yeon-ho OhFounder of OhmyNews. Visited other Swiss cities. Read Swiss Democracy. Glaris landsgemeinde.

“Every citizen can be a reporter.” Journalists are people who have news stories and share them with others. Every citizen can participate in the news process, whatever their age, and in many ways.

Example: a high-school teacher who has written 1685 articles, mainly on football. He doesn’t sleep, watches the game live on TV (time-difference, middle of night), writes it up between 7 and 8 in the morning. Passion! This kind of passion is not rare.

Similar passion seen at the landsgemeinde and in citizen journalists.

But is such citizen participation always good? This kind of participation is best when it is done for the right reasons. To make things better, not just to have one’s name on an article.

Beginning of OhmyNews: 4 staff members including him. Now 78, if I understood correctly.

Staff members and citizen reporters work together in the recruiting process.

A team of nine went to Paris to understand how France maintains a high birth rate: half staff, half reporters.

2008, Seoul, 72 hours of live webcasting (candle procession).

70% of income comes from advertising — they want to bring it down to 50%.

Recently, team invented 2 new income models:

  • 100,000 Club: “Let’s Study Together” — monthly fee; lectures in the OhmyNews offices. Lectures also streamed live online.
  • The “tip” system: upto 21K€ for a single story! *steph-note: not 100% sure* — readers can “tip” individual citizen journalists for their stories. Tip money is split between citizen and operational system.

Working on more ways to sustain OhmyNews.

Spectator to contributor: responsible, credible, sustainable.

William Tell play. Interviewed one of the amateur actresses.

In Glarus, every citizen is a legislator. In Interlaken, every citizen is an actor. In OhmyNews, every citizen is a reporter.

He never expected to make money — his background and interest in creating OhmyNews is purely journalistic. steph-note: another example of success taking by surprise the passionate and disinterested :-)

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | Leave a comment

Lift10 Workshop: Privacy vs. Freedom of Speech, Law enforcement and the internet

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is Privacy vs. Freedom of Speech, Law enforcement and the internet (Alexander Finger). May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

View presentation slides.

Google data requests and removal requests. Alexander tried to normalize the data (per million connected, etc.) Huge number of data requests per million connected in Brazil (59.3) and the UK (25.5). Explanation for UK: well organized, so when you ask for data you get it. France (24.2), Germany (8.7) — maybe a language issue.

Now, removal requests: very high in Armenia (53.4, but very low internet penetration). Brazil (4.7) and Germany (3.6 — if somebody writes something about you that you don’t like, you can go to court to have it taken down).

Alexander now works for Billag, but was the IT manager for Swisscom before — this talk is more linked to this previous position.

participants introduce themselves and say a few words on what they think about privacy; consensus: it’s complex; me: I’m starting to be sick of hearing about it and being asked to talk about it

Lift10 Privacy Freedom of Speech Workshop 2 Lift10 Privacy Freedom of Speech Workshop 1

Two days ago: myth of a disappearing privacy (it’s being redefined, actually) vs. start of the post-privacy era. One big issue for Alexander: forgiveness. steph-note: one issue here, the link between forgetting and forgiving

Alex thinks that Christian made the post-privacy thing a bit easy.

Issue, particularly for young people: we’re defined by others’ expectations of us, and all this online presence prevents us from “cutting loose” or “starting fresh”.

from now on, we’re talking quite a lot, so my notes are fragmented and also contain ideas that pass through my head

Maybe the most important thing is not how much information about you is available online, but how consciously you are doing it, and how aware you are of the implications.

Logfiles. When you send an e-mail or load a web page, the server knows stuff about you. Some browsers allow you to spoof info.

Problem: colliding information. Putting things together.

Being public about the fact you’re at a conference can let ill-intentioned people plan a break-in at your appartment, but they don’t know if there is a cat-sitter there, and also, your neighbours might also have this information and call the cops if they hear noise when they know you’re supposed to be away.

Privacy: the ability to reveal oneself selectively.

Bothering: people indexing sites who merge different people with the same name.

Drowning out information online with fake information.

European Convention on Human Rights: right to privacy.

Freedom of speech. In practice, it’s not absolute in any country, and subject to limitations.

Law enforcement. If you create an organization it will strive to keep itself alive. More policemen => more crime. Definition of crime changes with time. Our level of freedom is becoming narrower.

With the internet, it’s less easy to prevent unwanted expressions from being publicized. You could forbid printing and forbid selling.

Solutions: social.

The traditional strong influence of governments on communication is fading. It’s not a public service anymore. (In Germany, in particular => one of the reasons it’s been “behind” with the internet at the start.)

Importance of the liberalization of telecom.

Laws don’t normally address a specific technology. New technology is not a legislative but a law enforcement challenge.

Freedom of speech collides with privacy. Wide terms!

Is an IP address personal data? Personal data is subject to privacy. In Germany, if somebody publishes something and then is asked to take it down, then he is assimilated to being the person who said it => which is why so many takedown notices succeed in Germany.

Expressing an opinion about a business or a product can infringe the right to freely exercise that business. Hard to navigate between opinion and factual statement. A false factual statement does indeed infringe the rights associated with the business. (In Germany.)

It’s a hard world to navigate for companies! They don’t give a sh** about our privacy. When they are challenged to hand out user data, they make a risk assessment. Competing rules: Penal prodcure code and Penal law vs. Privacy Laws and Penal law. The prosecutor could ask the company to be a witness and hand over information. You can only refuse to be a witness if you would expose yourself to prosecution. (See where this is going?) If a company refuses to be a witness, you can be arrested, subjected to a fee etc => for a company, this is carried out on the managing director.

If the company agrees to be a witness, but refuses to talk, obstruction of justice, up to five years or fine (still the poor managing director).

So, not answering questions can lead to personal arrest and fines, and upto five years in prison. steph-note: see why they hand over your data?

Companies need to balance this pressure with the cost of violating somebody’s privacy: upto five years for violating secret of telecommunication (law created to prevent eavesdropping); data capture = two years or fine; illegal collection or mishandling of data = fine up to 50/100K€.

Alex: there is nothing new here (it’s just new to us because it’s the internet, but the laws are general).

Highly unlikely that any company would be punished for violating privacy, because they would have handed out the data in good faith. They didn’t do it to benefit financially. Choice: go to jail or pay a small penalty => they choose to hand over the data.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | Leave a comment

Lift10 Online Communities: The Revolution is Most Definitely Mobilized – Mobiles in Democratic Participation. Debunking Hype and Assessing Reality (Katrin Verclas)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is The Revolution is Most Definitely Mobilized – Mobiles in Democratic Participation. Debunking Hype and Assessing Reality (Katrin Verclas), part of the Online Communities session. May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

Lift10 Katrin Verclas

She’s an activist. Not really techy. 5 billion mobile subscribers in 2010. Wants to debunk some myths about how people participate. Only 1.8 billion people online. steph-note: not sure about that figure, might have misunderstood.

The hype cycle, with the trough of disillusionment. How mobiles are being used in political participation. steph-note: political? I think I’m tired. Examples are about HIV information.

Lift10 Arm Circumference

steph-note: OK, that was a series of examples of mobile use for health stuff, and now we’re back to politics.

Protests in Thailand. “Sousveillance” (citizens recording and denouncing abuses like police brutality). Myth of twittering during iranian demonstrations: the mobile network was cut off!!

Election monitoring is a long-standing practice.

Citizen reporting, unlike election monitoring: stuff people submit via web, Twitter, etc. Source of reports seem to show that Mexican NGOs prefer reporting through web/Twitter rather than SMS.

Budget monitoring. Budget tracking tool you can query by SMS.

Obama campaign: I’m voting because… I don’t want zombies to take over the world!

steph-note: sorry, the live-blogging machine has clearly broken down here :-(

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | 1 Comment

Lift10 Online Communities: YouTube’s Unfolding History (Jean Burgess)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is YouTube’s Unfolding History (Jean Burgess), part of the Online Communities session. May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

Lift10 Jean Burgess

YouTube’s competing futures, also! Participatory culture. Hype and counter-hype. “Person of the year = YOU” vs. Andrew Keen, Cult of the Amateur.

There has to be something more to this. YouTube as an object of study, as a cultural system. It’s five years old. 2005, your online video repository. First video: Jawed at the zoo. YouTube was undetermined. Now it’s huge. It was co-created.

Two YouTubes.

Vernacular creativity (the bedroom!!) and also a social network. The videoblog predates YouTube.

The most subscribed channels have emerged as part as the social network (not “brand” channels for example).

Other side: “traditional media content”. Pretty clear separation between TV shows and movies, etc, and the other messy activities of the social network inhabitants.

A global living-room, and online archive. A huge museum curated by the community. It has public value but it’s not a public institution.

YouTube, parodies, copyright violations. Commenting of news by others than the professional media (less mollycoddling).

Competing futures:

Lift10 YouTube Competing Futures

YouTube’s architecture does not promote the creation of community, actually fights against it.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | Leave a comment

Lift10 Online Communities: The Transition from Broadcast to Multiplatform for a public service broadcaster: getting attention and measuring success (Alice Taylor)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is The Transition from Broadcast to Multiplatform for a public service broadcaster: getting attention and measuring success (Alice Taylor), part of the Online Communities session. May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments.

Alice is specialized in games, works for Channel4. Just over two years ago. Head of education wanted to do sth different. Annual budget of about $1 moi £ for educational television shows to reach teenagers, mostly through teachers steph-note: I think I’m jumbling things up a bit here.

TV wasn’t working for education. Start spending where teenagers are: the internet. Self-described tribes (which change from year to year).

Lift10 Online Communities 1

Teenagers haven’t changed much, they’re just growing up with this stuff. What’s changed for us is trying to get their attention.

What’s changed is the time people have to spend on “stuff”. There are still only 24h in a day. She doesn’t buy that multitasking gives you longer days. steph-note: I don’t either

Digital budget pretty big, because they have TV-sized budgets to work with :-)

Everything was created for Channel 4 by outside agencies. Trying to do something not in a curriculum.

4 things:

  • games
  • tv
  • tv with tools
  • *steph-note: didn’t get the 4th one*

Smokescreengame.

Rather than lecture them when they mess up, let them play through scenarios.

How do you approach DNA in an engaging way? Catch a killer… Casual games.

Other example: science of scams.

Metrics: number of teens reached + feedback from interested parties + feedback from critics… and divide by cost. (Qualitative and quantitative, blended.)

Games are a fantastic way of reaching kids.

Spikes in traffic from things like TV ads, or SXSW win.

In some situations, TV is the best media — telling people’s stories for example.

Super Me Videos: they gain points when they watch videos.

Perennial topics: sex, drugs, alcohol, relationships, health… but also money and other new topics.

Sex education game: Privates (great way to reach boys — will be live in June)

The Curfew, political game.

steph-note: all this looks really great, though I’m having trouble following some of the explanations

“Afterlife” — death & belief MiniMO.

Facebook games were the big surprise because they don’t come from the gaming industry. They are at the heart of “playing with friends”, and go even deeper (you “help” John with his farm, role-playing dimension).

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | Leave a comment

Lift10 Generations: How and why are the current generation staying connected? (Julian Zbar)

Here are my running notes of the Lift conference in Geneva. This is How and why are the current generation staying connected? (Julian Zbar), part of the Generations and Technologies session. May contain errors, omissions, things that aren’t quite right, etc. I do my best but I’m just a human live-blogging machine.

Found other good posts about this session? Link to them in the comments. After the workshop with real live teenagers 2 years ago, a real live young man comes to be the witness of his generation.

Julian is 20, his name isn’t on his first slide. Largely based on personal experience. How technology is affecting his generation. Very similar to other generations. True and false preconceptions about them. We are the same human beings. Two arms, two legs, etc.

Lift10 Julian Zbar

Part of the internet as it is a part of them. Just as cost-conscious as older generations, except they expect everything to be free. Whatever you do now, you need to be connected to the internet. Devices are disposable.

There is no opportunity cost for being online. Once you pay the monthly fee, you’re not giving up anything to be on it. Nobody pays, cares, feels guilty (music, software). Used to receiving a lot and giving back nothing in return.

No such thing as a free lunch but the internet is serving us all the free lunches that our hard drive stomachs can handle.

Accustomed to constant connection, constant changes, instantaneous results. Much less effort to get news online than going out and buying the paper => cheapens the information consumed. No effort, less value. No need to make a conscious choice. Discard things they don’t like rather than picking what they do like. Choosing takes too much time.

Filling empty space in the day by doing something, always something to do. The internet is everywhere. Pick it up, take it wherever you go. We are never doing nothing. Not an exponential growth in productivity. Very easy to fill every moment with some sort of activity.

Facebook. A few years ago there was a small facebook resistance, but now pretty much everyone he knows has a facebook account. Being social is no longer an active thing. It’s the default. Paparazzi magazine of everyone you have ever met. Loss of the beauty of meeting somebody. You know first name, last name, and everything about them. You feel you’ve met people that you’ve never physically met. Is there a necessity to meet them in real life? Facebook changes the way you act, even when you’re not using it (during your disconnect time).

Social acts are trivialized. Judging, commenting, liking, etc. Negative or positive things you receive do not have the same impact as offline. Emotionally charged stuff on facebook because it’s easier without the physical person in front of you. Parallels with road rage. (steph-note: flame wars, same phenomenon. Flipside of the coin: easier to say difficult things, but also easier to be damageable.)

Privacy. People don’t worry. You can restrict access but there is always a way of finding stuff out (through a friend, etc.)

Very easy to post things, make things public. But the internet doesn’t help you curate, sort through all the data. Always something new, but what’s important? Mimics the creatures that we are. Easy to post, easy to consume. Quick and easy for everybody, and that’s what they want.

Q: Addiction? Doesn’t feel like he needs to be connected all the time, everybody is doing it (almost), it’s normal to be connected all the time. It’s how things are.

Doesn’t see the point of Twitter if you have Facebook. steph-note: the big big difference is that the social network on Twitter is asymmetrical.

People act online the same way they would offline. People don’t change when they’re on the internet, maybe just a little less inhibited.

Social networks like facebook make you think (privacy). You don’t throw around photos when you know 600 people have access to it and can show it to your friends, in the same way you’d do it in person.

Because you’re on Facebook doesn’t mean you’re constantly speaking to people you haven’t seen in 3 years. You’re just doing the same things you’d normally do. Easy way to invite people to stuff without sending out 10 e-mails, etc. etc.

Everybody has their own criteria for adding friends. Julian, for example, will accept incoming requests if he’s exchanged more than a few sentences with the person.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Live Blogging | Tagged lift10 | 2 Comments