Tag Archives: name

Sometimes We Need Pseudonyms

[fr] Pourquoi on a besoin de l'anonymat et du pseudonymat en ligne.

Ten years ago, if I’d spent over an hour reading stuff on a website, I would probably have written a blog post about it. Not necessarily a long blog post. But I would have blogged about it.

Nowadays, I share the link on Twitter and Facebook. (I’m having trouble dragging myself to Google+, for some reason, and only just signed up for App.net — can I please have a client that allows me to post to all four at the same time? maybe even with customized text for each, but from the same place? please?)

So today, here’s My Name Is Me. Picked up on Twitter, and I’ve already forgotten through who. Click on some names there. Read the stories.

I’m a self-confessed fan of real names (it goes way back) — but I’m by far not an absolutist. I believe in trying to live an “integrated” life, in being as whole as reasonably possible in the various aspects of my life. I’m lucky to have a life and circumstances which make that pursuit realistic. Though I have my secrets and I do value my privacy (even if it doesn’t include certain things many others would consider private) I am not in a situation where there are whole aspects of my life I need to keep from certain people. I’m straight, I don’t have an employer, I’m not in a job like teaching or being a therapist or a lawyer where my personal life could be of interest to the people I work with, I’m not well-known enough for fame (or that of others close to me) to mess up my relations with people, I’m not an abuse survivor or an activist. I have it easy.

Like many of the people sharing their stories on My Name Is Me, I don’t believe enforcing real names will eliminate bad behaviour. I think it’s reasonably legitimate for some spaces to ask people to use their most stable identity (usually their “real name”), but there are always edge cases. I also believe there is a huge difference between “anonymity” (often short-lived and slippery) and a stable pseudonymic identity accompanied by a verifiable reputation. I think such identities are fragile, but sometimes they are the less bad solution.

I started off my life online very careful (almost paranoid) about keeping my real name a secret. I was afraid. Afraid of all these “strangers” populating the internet, the weirdos I might stumble upon. After a while I chose a pseudonym which I started using (“Tara Star“) as my “real name”. Some people knew my real name, but most didn’t. I was active on Webdesign-L at the time, and remember that I began feeling increasingly uneasy that (a) all the people around me seemed to be using their civilian identity, and I was kind of “cheating” and (b) I was building a reputation for myself which was not connected to who I “really” was. That’s an important bit: Tara Star was just a buffer for me between who I was and this strange online world that still scared me. Who I was was Stephanie Booth. I took the plunge to ditch Tara and be fully Stephanie online when I registered the domain name for this blog — also realizing that the domain registration made it possible for me to be looked up.

Trolls and haters are a problem online. The fact they are often (not always) anon/pseudonymous does not mean that others don’t have valid reasons for hiding their identities, nor that they are unable to use a pseudonym responsibly.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Connected Life | Tagged anonymat, anonymity, identité, identity, name, pseudonym, pseudonymat, real name | Leave a comment

Pseudonyms on Facebook

[fr] Vrais noms, faux noms, Facebook. Oui, je suis un peu crispée là-dessus.

I have to admit to a bit of a hang-up: I don’t like pseudonyms in real-names-only spaces.The first time I realized I disliked them in that context (and in that context only — I have no problem in general with anonymity/pseudonymity, except that it’s fragile and potentially dangerous to the one who tries to hide, and is bound to be discovered someday) a very long time ago, in another life, when I was very active on an e-mail discussion list called webdesign-L.

At the time, I was still suffering from the paranoia of the newcomer on the Internets: nobody shall know who I am, nobody shall know where I live, nobody shall know what I look like, nobody shall identify me. (Yes, my real online life started in the murky chatrooms of Chatplanet, in 98. I was completely freaked out about these “anonymous strangers”. I’ve come a long way.)

Until I registered climbtothestars.org, I used a pseudonym as my “real name” in all my online dealings: Tara Star. My coming-out as Stephanie Booth was not difficult, because by that time I had become increasingly uncomfortable about the fact that

  1. I was misleading a whole bunch of really nice people about my identity, when they were being honest about theirs
  2. I was starting to build a reputation for myself which was disconnected from my civilian identity.

So, on Facebook it’s different. The few contacts I have who use “fake names” use “obviously fake” names. I knew them offline before connecting to them on Facebook (you won’t find me connecting to people on Facebook that I don’t already know previously somehow or other, by the way).

But it bothers me that Facebook explicitly says “Real Names Please” and that not everyone plays by the rules. Now, I understand the rationale behind the need for anonymity/pseudonymity in some cases. That’s why I say I have a hang-up, because my position is not 100% coherent. It bothers me when people willfully “go against social norms”.

From a more practical point of view, it really annoys me to have to remember that this or that person is using this or that pseudonym on Facebook, when I know them under their real name in meatspace. It makes looking them up and inviting them to stuff complicated. And when they have two accounts, it’s even worse. Which of them do I invite? Thank goodness it’s only a small handful of my contacts that makes me think overtime ;-)

This is an old topic for me – we discussed it at length on Spirolattic.

So, Facebook? Well, my hang-up makes it really difficult for me to say “yes” to friend requests from people who don’t use their real identity (or some minor variation thereof) on Facebook. But well, there are exceptions. So, dear friends-with-two-accounts-or-fake-names, consider what you mean to me if you’re in my contacts!

Thanks to Jon Husband for his question on Facebook, which prompted me to produce this dormant post.

#back2blog challenge (8/10):

Similar Posts:

Posted in Connected Life | Tagged anonymat, anonymity, facebook, fake name, identity, name, nick names, pseudonymity, real names | Leave a comment

Google Identity Dilemma

[fr] Depuis des années, j'utilise une identité "fantaisiste" pour tous mes services Google. C'est mon identité principale (vous voyez de laquelle je parle si on est en contact). J'aimerais passer à prénom.nom comme identité principale (je la possède aussi) mais tous les services Google sont rattachés à la première, et je ne vois pas vraiment comment m'en sortir. Idées bienvenues!

When I created a Gmail address all these years ago, I chose a “funny-cute” name that was easy to remember for most of the people I knew. I was on IRC all day back then, and my nickname was bunny(wabbit_), and people knew I was Swiss.

I didn’t really think my Gmail address would become so central to my online identity, you see.

Of course, I also registered firstname.lastname and redirected it onto my main e-mail address and identity.

As years went by, Google added all sorts of services that got tied onto this identity (not to mention the 2.5Gb of archived e-mails and chats). Google Talk, Google Profiles, and recently, Google Sidewiki and Google Wave.

These last weeks, I’ve been wondering if I shouldn’t “make the switch” and use my more serious “firstname.lastname” e-mail address as my main identity. Actually, to be honest, I’d like to. But there are obstacles — oh, so many.

First, all my contacts are linked to my current account. All my e-mail is stuck in it. My Feedburner and Google Reader settings are linked to it. My blogger blog is. My calendar. Everywhere I use my Google identity for a third-party service, here we go.

And Google does not allow you to link one Google account to another (sure, you can redirect mail, but that doesn’t solve anything).

So, do you see my problem? If you have any bright ideas, I’m listening. I would really like a solution.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Connected Life, Personal | Tagged calendar, centralization, dilemma, e-mail, feedburner, gmail, google, google reader, google sidewiki, google talk, google wave, identity, name, profile, services | 12 Comments

What Do We Call Ourselves?

[fr] Un article de plus dans la longue série "Stephanie se demande comment appeler ce qu'elle fait". Si "social media expert" a été usé jusqu'à la corde, que reste-t-il à une "spécialiste généraliste" des nouveaux médias comme moi?

This morning I read 6 Reasons You Shouldn’t Brand Yourself as a Social Media Expert. It echoes with a piece I wrote earlier this year: To Be or Not to Be a New Media Strategist, in which I (a) explain that I have finally understood that the core of my work is strategy and (b) wonder what to call myself.

I pride myself in being one of these “early generation” people, not a “me too”. This year the blog you’re reading will celebrate its 9th birthday, which means that although I’m not the oldest dinosaur out there, I was already blogging when many who are now considered respected old-timers wrote their first post. I’ve been earning money in the field of what we now call social media since early 2005 — and this is Europe, little Switzerland, not the US of Silicon Valley. And without wanting to blame all my failures on being too innovative, I like to think that at least some of them have to do with trying to do things too soon, before the market was ready for them.

The facts above are not just to toot my own horn (a little, I’ll admit) but to drive in the point that I have a very different profile from people who discovered social media, noted that it was (or was going to be) hot, and decided to jump in and make money out of it. Not that there’s anything wrong with that… I think. I’m somebody who has always been driven more by my interest in things than by “earning money” — my somewhat mediocre business skills (monetizing, marketing, sales). What “title” can I find to differentiate myself from all the other people who are now in the field?

When I was reading Dan’s article, I kept thinking “yes, but what if I really am a social media expert?” I’m not a “had a blog for 18 months” or “I know what Twitter is” kind of expert. And I’m also not somebody who sticks to one kind of activity or domain of expertise (e.g. “teenagers and the net” or “blogging for internal communications”).

A few days ago I came upon this diagram by Budd Caddell, which has had me thinking:

Venn diagram for happiness as a freelancer.

I’m aware that part of my ongoing struggle to define myself for others has to do with my internal struggle to figure out what it is exactly that I do, want to do, can get paid to do. I know what I have been paid to do during the last three years. I have more insight into what I don’t like doing and others want me to do, and am learning to say no. “What I do well” is a bigger problem, because part of me keeps thinking that I suck at more or less everything I do, and though I know it’s not true, it makes self-assessment tricky.

I also think I have a bit of a “generalist” profile: I’m good at a lot of things, but probably, for each thing that I do, you can find somebody who is a bigger “expert” — but who will have a more limited field of expertise. I view myself as a kind of “generalist specialist”, or “generalist expert” in my field.

Many years ago, I wrote a rant in French about so-called “blogging specialists”. (For the sake of the discussion here, let’s consider that specialist = expert.) At the time, I was concerned about the need of the press to be able to quote “specialists”, and they were labeling bloggers “specialists” left, right, and centre, me included. At the time, I felt anything like a specialist, and resented the misattribution.

I guess the same thing bugs me today. People labeling themselves “experts” when, in all honesty, they’re not that much of an expert (see reason #1 in Dan’s article). It’s easy to be somebody else’s expert when you know more than them: au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont rois. I see it a lot. It annoys me for two reasons: first, there is sometimes a certain amount of dishonesty or deception (conscious or not) involved; second, if everybody is an expert (reason #6), how do you distinguish between the experts? How do I label myself to make it clear that I am not the same breed as the buzzing crowd of “me too” web2.0 or social media “experts”?

Dan offers a solution in his article, but I’m only half-convinced:

The pioneers of new media are still successful today, but they don’t even brand themselves as “social media experts.”  Think about experts such as David Meerman Scott, Paul Gillan, Chris Brogan, Charlene Li, Steve Rubel, and Robert Scoble.  David is an author who has successfully blended social media with PR and marketing before everyone else.  Chris Brogan focuses more on social media’s impact on community building and he’s been blogging religiously before the medium became mainstream.  Don’t try and brand yourself as one of them because you’ll fail trying.

I guess this works if you really have an area of specialisation in social media, but that’s just not the type of personality I am. I see it in other areas too, take judo, for example: most judo practitioners have one “special”, a move that stands out — I have at least 3 that could be my “special”; how about studies? I spent my career switching between arts and science.

So when it comes to my work, what am I good at? I’m good at a lot of things:

But in none of these areas am I “the most extraordinary person out there”. My strength is that I do all these things, and pretty well too — but there is nothing I can put forward to say “I’m the ultimate expert on X”.

How do I market myself? What do I call myself, if I can’t call myself a social media expert?

Update: Prompted by the same blog post, and written as I was writing this one, do read Suw’s excellent article about the necessity of keeping the E-word around: Hi, my name is Suw and I’m a social media expert.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Being the boss, Social Media and the Web | Tagged branding, competition, Consulting, freelancing, marketing, name, Social Media and the Web, social media expert, social media strategist, terminology, title | 13 Comments

Getting Rid of www

[fr] Une recette pour faire disparaître magiquement ce satané "www" des noms de domaines que j'héberge...

I personally hate having “www” in front of a domain name. It’s redundant. If we’re visiting a website, we’re on the web anyway. It also brings no end of problems when people start writing for the web and creating links, because they think that what makes something a “website address” is the “www” in front if it, instead of “http://”. That’s how they end up with links like “http://example.com/www.yahoo.com” on their sites. But I digress.

On one of the sites I manage, we have a restricted members-only area. However, our users started reporting that when they used “www” in front of the domain name, they were being asked for the password twice. I tried myself, and I was simply asked for the password ad aeternam. Probably a server configuration glitch somewhere.

Anyway, I decided the simplest solution was to redirect all “www” requests to the non-www domain. I know I had that in place for CTTS at some point, but the setting must have got lost at some point. Instead of sticking rewrite rules in .htaccess as no-www.org suggests, I modified my vhost configuration slightly so that it looked like this:

<virtualHost *:80>
ServerName example.com
DocumentRoot /home/example/www/
ErrorLog logs/example-error
CustomLog logs/example-access combined
</virtualHost>

<virtualHost *:80>
ServerName www.example.com
Redirect permanent / http://example.com/
</virtualHost>

Try it!

http://www.cafecafe.ch/

Many thanks to those who gave suggestions and nudged me along the way to this solution.

Similar Posts:

Tagged apache, domain, htaccess, name, no-www, Real Live Code, vhost, web, website, www | Leave a comment

Anonymat et blog intime

[en] My reaction to a new French-speaking blogger who desires to remain anonymous because he will be dealing with private stuff on his blog.

I consider that it is not possible to blog anonymously in the long run. As you create relationships with readers, temptation to let out your real name to some of them will be great, and at some point somebody may let your name slip. Or if that doesn't happen, somebody who knows you might come upon your blog by chance and recognize you through the contents of your writing.

Writing with a pseudonym to keep oneself from unknown stalkers is fine. But when the pseudonym is there to keep people who know you from recognizing you, the consequences to face when it does happen may be very uncomfortable

Saturnin says his "blogging rule" is to not write anything he wouldn't be willing to stand up for if he was discovered. I ask him, then, what his anonymity adds to his blogging enterprise, apart from the fact he won't be easily googled for. If being anonymous helps him write more freely then if he was signing with, say, his first name, then maybe being anonymous is a trick he's playing on himself, and he might be brought to regretting it someday.

Saturnin entre en blogosphère il y a dix jours, avec un billet dont le contenu m’interpelle. Il nous annonce un blog intime, anonyme, et il nous en donne les raisons:

La condition : l’anonymat, quoi qu’on en pense. Impossible en effet de m’attacher à exprimer mes pensées et mes sentiments les plus secrets, impossible de livrer ma vie intérieure profonde sous mon vrai nom. Je suis enseignant. J’ai des élèves et des étudiants, que je vois chaque jour. Imagine, mon lecteur, que mes étudiants lisent mon blogue quotidiennement et sachent, avant même que j’entre en classe, dans quel état j’erre. Impossible.

Saturnin fait référence dans son billet à ma théorie des deux anonymats, et je sens justement dans son dernier billet, intitulé le droit à l’anonymat, un mélange un peu flou entre les deux.

Là où je rejoins entièrement Saturnin, c’est sur le fait que l’anonymat n’est pas mauvais en soi. Edicter une règle du style “Tu ne blogueras point anonymement” est inévitablement réducteur et ne tiens pas comptes des motivations du blogueur qui cherche à protéger son identité. Dans le passage reproduit ci-dessus, Saturnin nous dit clairement pourquoi la solution de l’anonymat s’est imposée à lui. Il désire parler de choses privées, intimes même, et ne désire pas être reconnu par un partie de son entourage (ses élèves en particulier — comme je le comprends).

Ma mise en garde contre l’anonymat qui cherche à préserver une intimité, c’est-à -dire à cacher ses écrits de personnes que l’on connaît, provient du fait que celui-ci peut s’écrouler. Sur le web, deux phénomènes peuvent précipiter cet écroulement (ou cet éclatement, suivant comment les choses se vivent).

  1. Le blog crée des conversations (comme celle-ci!) puis des liens entre le blogueur et ses lecteurs. Ces liens peuvent être forts, surtout dans le cas d’écrits intimes qui risquent de toucher profondément les lecteurs. Des correspondances par e-mail sont à prévoir. A un moment donné, le blogueur va peut-être donner sa véritable identité à quelqu’un dont il se sent proche. Des fuites sont alors possibles.

    J’ai vécu cela lorsque j’ai commencé à chatter en 1998. Mon identité véritable était un secret d’état. Assez rapidement cependant, je me suis fait des amis proches via le chat. On a échangé des mails. Vient un moment où l’on désire dire qui l’on est et ne plus se cacher derrière un pseudonyme. On résiste beaucoup la première fois, moins les suivantes. Un jour, par pure maladresse et sans aucune mauvaise intention, sans réaliser que c’était un problème pour moi, une fille avec qui je correspondais lâche mon nom complet en public, dans le chat. Bingo.

  2. Lorsque l’on écrit sur le web, les écrits ont tendance à s’accumuler. Il peut arriver, un jour, par hasard (et cela arrive!) que quelqu’un de notre entourage tombe sur nos écrits. Là , c’est le contenu de nos écrits qui nous trahit. Un billet ne trahira personne. Dix-huit mois de récit de vie, de cogitations, et d’états d’âme, oui.

Conclusion: l’anonymat sur le web n’est pas une chose sur laquelle on peut véritablement compter à long terme. Se pose alors la question de ce qui arriverait (les conséquences) s’il devenait connu publiquement que nos écrits précédemment anonymes nous appartiennent.

Quand je m’adresse à un public d’adolescents, clairement, il s’agit de prévenir des délits punissables par la loi ou des indiscrétions graves qui pourraient leur faire du tort. Beaucoup d’adolescents se sentent véritablement protégés par leur “anonymat” sur le web, qui est au fond très fragile.

Saturnin n’est plus un adolescent, par contre ;-) et ne va donc pas se croire “tout permis” parce qu’il ne signe pas de son nom. Même caché, il veut écrire de façon responsable:

Ma règle, c’est de fausser les noms et de ne rien publier que je ne pourrais assumer si j’étais découvert.

C’est fort bien. Assumer n’a ici pas une consonnance juridique, mais personnelle. Si Saturnin parle de sa vie sentimentale sur son blog, et que par un concours de circonstances encore inconnu, son nom devient public, alors il devra assumer face à son entourage ce dont il a parlé. Entourage qui inclut ses élèves.

Ma question à Saturnin: si ton anonymat “responsable et lucide”, comme j’ai envie de l’appeler, te fait choisir de n’écrire que des choses que tu es prêt à assumer face au monde, connu et inconnu, ton anonymat t’apporte-t-il réellement autre chose que la certitude qu’on n’aterrira pas sur ton blog lorsque l’on jette ton nom en pâture à Google? S’il te permet de te livrer plus qu’un simple “anonymat-discrétion” ou qu’une signature de ton simple prénom, n’est-il pas en train de te jouer un tour?

Similar Posts:

Tagged anonymat, anonyme, anonymity, anonymous, assumer, blog, bloggers, blogging, Blogosphere Interest, discrétion, journalintime, name, nom, privacy, Psychology / Sociology, saturnin, vieprivée | 4 Comments

Tracking Keywords: PubSub and Technorati

[fr] Comparaison de PubSub et Technorati pour surveiller des mots-clés dans la blogosphère. Aucun des deux vraiment satisfaisant.

One thing I came back with from LIFT’06 is that what one should monitor is more keyword watchlists, rather than blogs. I used to have a few hundred blogs in an aggregator, but gave up using it ages ago. Too much to sift through, considering it isn’t my day job to do so.

During his talk, Robert mentioned that he used PubSub to track keywords like “Microsoft” or his name. Of course, it makes sense. Tracking topics that are of interest to you. I created a PubSub account and set up a few subscriptions to try to track things like mentions of my hometown, Lausanne, teenagers and weblogs, and of course my name. Tracking your name makes a lot of sense if you’re looking out for conversations. Think of highlighting in IRC: if everybody tracks their name in blogs, then you can just call out to them. Hi, Robert, by the way!

Now, this name thing. I guess tracking your surname with PubSub is all right if you’re named Scoble, but if you’re named Booth it makes things much trickier. I added my first name, but that didn’t help much if I omitted the quotes. And as people are likely to refer to me as “Stephanie Booth”, “Stéphanie Booth”, “Steph Booth” or even “Stéph Booth” that’s a bunch to track, but let’s say it’s manageable. But it rules out people who refer to me as “bunny” or even “Tara” (yeah, and if I start tracking those too, it’s not going to make things less messy).

What I really liked about PubSub is that it offers me an out-of-the-box sidebar for firefox. I can get a list of the recent posts containing my keywords in there, browse them, click, check, move on. It has highlighting too, and that’s really nice — helps me see straight away if the Stephanie Booth on the page is me or some homonym. (For some reason it’s not working anymore, but it was nice while it lasted.)

What I didn’t like is that it didn’t seem to be returning as many results as Technorati. Also, I wasn’t always sure if it was responding or not (I guess the current conversation around my name isn’t very busy ;-) ). And the “Latest Messages” option only gave me the last three posts in each subscription. It gave me the impression of being a little incomplete in the results it returned. I suspect it isn’t really incomplete, but I can’t really nail what gives me the impression. In any case, PubSub and Technorati give different results for a search on “cocomment”

The slight unsatisfaction with PubSub made me go back to Technorati watchlists, which I had never really used. I like the idea of tracking URLs in posts. If somebody links to me, then it doesn’t matter if the person called me “Stéph Booth” or “Tara” or “la Mère Denis“, I’ll see it. I can also track links to my Flickr account and other blogs and stuff easily. Keyword searches work too. So, neat, I now have a watchlist page on Technorati with all my monitoring material. I can subscribe to each of them by RSS.

Gripes, however. And for the sake of it, let’s assume I’m hoping my watchlists will replace my NewsReader, and not go and live in it:

  • I can only expand one watchlist at a time.
  • Expanding a watchlist shows only the three last results.
  • I don’t have a compilation page with the latest results from all/any of my watchlists.
  • I’d like a sidebar!
  • Blogroll links keep showing up in Technorati search results. It’s nice to know you’ve been blogrolled, but you don’t need to be reminded of it each time you do a search.
  • No highlighting!

What it boils down to: I’d like a Technorati Watchlist sidebar for FireFox and highlighting of search terms or URL in the pages which are loaded from it.

Do you monitor keywords, URLs or search terms? Do you use PubSub or Technorati? Do you stick the results in your feed reader to keep track of them?

Update: of course, I’m much more familiar with Technorati, so there might be something about PubSub I’m missing completely. Feel free to educate me.

Similar Posts:

Posted in Social Media and the Web | Tagged Blogger musings, blogosphère, feature, feedback, firefox, keywords, Kit du blogueur, monitoring, name, newsreader, pubsub, rss, search, sidebar, subscription, suggestion, technorati, watchlist, Weblog Technology | 17 Comments

Google et les noms

[en] Mentioning the name of somebody in one's blog can have embarrassing consequences. People with less web presence than the blogger might find their official site behind a blog post that mentions them in passing when they google their name. How do you know if people will be happy to get your google juice or not? Bloggers are always happy with google juice... but what about the non-blogging crowd?

As people with the power to express themselves in public, bloggers have responsabilities they might not be well-prepared for. Here are a few embarrassing experiences I made: for exemple, unintentionally google-bombing people I had no hard feelings against, or not giving google juice when it would have been appreciated.

Tagging adds to the difficulty for the blogger, as tags are often chosen for private reasons, but as they are links that are indexed, they have an impact on the online presence of other people when they are of the firstname+name form.

Depuis quelque temps, je médite sur la responsabilité du blogueur qui nomme dans son blog d’autres personnes que lui, particulièrement si celui-ci a passablement de “google juice”, comme on dit en anglais. En effet, si je nomme une personne dans mon blog, il y a de fortes chances que mon article se retrouve en position assez proéminente lorsque l’on recherche le nom de cette personne.

Si vous cherchez mon nom dans Google, la grande majorité des liens sur les deux ou trois premières pages m’appartiennent — je suis responsable de la présence de mon nom dans ces pages. C’est le cas, bien entendu, parce que je suis quelqu’un qui a une très forte présence en ligne et une vie sociale “internautique” importante. (Je rassure les lecteurs qui ne me connaîtraient pas assez… ma vie sociale “non-internautique” se porte également très bien!)

Ce “pouvoir” que me donne mon blog peut être utile lorsque quelqu’un désire obtenir plus de visibilité sur le net (hop! un petit lien, ça donne un coup de pouce au référencement d’un site qui se lance, par exemple), mais c’est surtout une petite bombe qui peut se déclencher de façon involontaire si je ne fais pas particulièrement attention. Par exemple, je suis allée mercredi à  un concert que j’ai apprécié. J’évite de mettre le nom de l’artiste dans le titre de mon billet, de peur qu’il n’arrive ce qui arrive à  l’école d’arts martiaux dans laquelle je m’entraîne: en cherchant le nom de l’école dans Google, mon article est placé avant le site officiel de l’école. C’est un peu embarrassant!

Il y a encore bien pire: reprenons le cas de l’artiste de mercredi, dont j’écoute les chansons régulièrement depuis quelque temps. J’ai un compte LastFM, qui établit des statistiques sur les morceaux que j’écoute avec iTunes. Je publie sur la première page de Climb to the Stars la liste des derniers morceaux écoutés; cette liste renvoie aux pages consacrées aux morceaux en question sur LastFM (par exemple: We Will Rock You (Queen). On peut y lire combien de personnes ont écouté le morceau, et encore bien d’autres choses fort sympathiques. Si on cherche le nom de l’artiste (LB) dans Google, on voit que la page LastFM qui lui est consacrée (et qui existe par ma faute, si on veut) sort droit derrière son site officiel. Limite embarrassant, également!

Donc, je ne mets pas son nom complet dans ce billet. Premièrement, cet article ne lui est pas consacré en tant qu’artiste, ce qui m’embarrasserait triplement s’il finissait bien placé dans Google pour une recherche sur son nom. Deuxièmement, mon Cheese Sandwich Blog est bien plus récent que Climb to the Stars, moins bien référencé, et avec un peu de chance il le restera, puisqu’il est consacré à  mon petit quotidien plutôt qu’à  des questions d’importance nationale comme celle que vous êtes en train de lire maintenant. Une mention “en passant” du nom de LB dans le corps d’un article ne porte pas à  conséquence sur mon “petit blog”, mais qu’en serait-il dans celui-ci? Je ne veux pas prendre le risque.

L’expérience me rend prudente. Il y a quelques mois, on m’a demandé de retirer un nom de mon blog. La personne en question avait fait des photos de moi pour l’article dans Migros Magazine, et m’avait gentiment autorisé à  les mettre en ligne sur Flickr. Comme je considère qu’il faut citer ses sources et l’annoncer lorsqu’on utilise le travail de quelqu’un d’autres, j’avais consciencieusement mis son nom dans mon article et également dans les tags des photos en question. Ce que je n’avais pas prévu, c’est que ces photos, qui ne sont pas forcément représentatives de son travail, et qu’elle m’a laissé à  bien plaire mettre dans mon album photos en ligne, se retrouveraient en première position lorsque l’on cherchait son nom dans Google. Ma présence en ligne étant plus forte que la sienne, j’ai littéralement fait mainmise sur son nom sans m’en rendre compte. Bien entendu, j’ai immédiatement fait de mon mieux pour réparer les choses quand elle me l’a demandé (à  juste titre!), et si j’en crois ce que je vois dans Google, les choses sont maintenant rentrées dans l’ordre. Néanmoins, expérience embarrassante (j’ai déjà  utilisé ce mot aujourd’hui?)

La généralisation des folksnomies pour catégoriser et classer l’information, à  l’aide de “tags” ou “étiquettes”, ajoute encore des occasions de commettre des impairs malgré soi. Sur Flickr, par exemple, il est souvent d’usage d’accoler un tag nom+prénom lorsqu’une photo représente quelqu’un. Mais lorsque je mets en ligne une série de photos passablement floues prises après le concert dont j’ai parlé, est-ce que je vais mettre le nom et le prénom de chaque personne sur chacune des photos? Du coup, j’ai commencé à  être un peu plus parcimonieuse dans ma distribution de tags: nom+prénom pour un petit nombre de photos, et un prénom ou un diminutif pour les autres. Le problème avec les tags, c’est que je les utilise surtout pour pouvoir m’y retrouver dans les 4000+ photos que j’ai mises en ligne. Mais en même temps, les tags sont également des liens, et sont également indexés par Google. Ma façon d’organiser mes photos va avoir un impact sur la présence en ligne d’autres personnes. Potentiellement embarrassant quand il s’agit de noms de personnes!

Comment peut-on deviner si une personne donnée préfère que son nom soit mis en avant sur le web, ou pas? Dans le doute, mieux vaut s’abstenir — c’est le message que je tente de faire passer aux ados lors de mes conférences. Ces conférences, en passant, c’est très bien pour moi: à  force de répéter les choses aux gens, je suis forcée d’y réfléchir, et des fois je me rends compte que ma position à  certains sujets est en mouvement…

Cependant… s’abstenir n’est pas une solution sans risques. Plus récemment, alors que je préparais un site dans lequel on parlait du parcours de quelques personnes, j’ai justement évité de mettre en ligne des pages vides (ou presque) ayant pour titre le nom de quelqu’un lorsque je n’avais rien de précis à  y mettre. Ce que je n’avais pas prévu, c’est que l’absence de page signifiait également l’absence du nom dans ce qui ressemble à  la “table des matières” du site et créait un déséquilibre dans la présence en ligne des différents acteurs — ce qui m’a été reproché (à  juste titre également).

A moins que la personne nommée ne soit un blogueur, je dirais que mettre un nom dans un billet est une chose délicate. Plus ou moins délicate, selon que le nom est dans le corps du billet, sur du texte lié, dans le titre du billet, ou pire, dans le titre de la page. Plus ou moins délicat également selon la visibilité du blog dans lequel c’est fait.

Les gens vont-ils nous en vouloir d’avoir cité leur nom? Vont-ils nous en vouloir de ne pas l’avoir fait, ou pas assez? Il n’est pas toujours possible de vérifier auparavant avec la personne en question. De plus, même si on vérifie, la personne est-elle pleinement des conséquences de l’une ou l’autre route? Une vérification sérieuse ne pourra manquer de s’accompagner d’une explication du fonctionnement du référencement, ce qui risque de crisper certains… à  tort.

Voici à  mon sens démontrée une nouvelle fois l’utilité d’une forte présence en ligne. Vous pouvez mettre mon nom où vous voulez, ça ne me dérange pas, car je sais que sur Google, c’est moi qui possède mon nom.

Ce que démontre également ce genre de situation, c’est la responsabilité qui va avec ce que j’appelle la “parole publique”. La parole publique est un pouvoir, et avant internet, ce pouvoir était en principe limité aux personnes dont c’était le métier (journalistes, politiciens, écrivains). Avec internet, ce pouvoir se démocratise, et c’est une bonne chose. Mais nous sommes peu préparés à  la responsabilité qui va avec. Avec la façon dont fonctionnent les moteurs de recherche comme Google, on ne peut plus écrire sans avoir présent à  l’esprit les conséquences que cela pourrait avoir pour le référencement d’autres sites.

Similar Posts:

Tagged blog, blogger, Blogger musings, blogging, Blogosphere Interest, egogoogling, enligne, Essay-Like, flickr, google, googlebombing, identité, identity, internet, lastfm, liens, Links, name, namedropping, nom, online, parole, public, publique, recherche, responsabilité, responsability, search, speech, tags | 12 Comments