LIFT08: My Going Solo Open Stage Speech [en]

[fr] J'ai fait une présentation très courte de ce qui m'a inspiré à organiser Going Solo tout à l'heure, lors de LIFT. Voici le texte sur la base duquel j'ai préparé ma présentation, et des liens (quand je les aurai trouvés) vers vidéos ou articles.

For the first time in my life, I actually rehearsed a speech. Ironically, my three-hour workshop yesterday required all of 5 minutes preparation time on the train in the morning (in my defense, I given similar workshop/classes before), but my 5-minute open stage speech had me preparing and rehearsing for at least three hours. My friend Sarah probably got sick of hearing it over and over again last night as she timed me.

It went well. Thanks again to all [who voted to see me speak on stage](http://www.liftconference.com/going-solo-being-freelancer-connected-world), and for your kind and encouraging comments after my speech.

You could probably see I was a bit stressed — quite a bit more than when I usually [speak](http://stephanie-booth.com/en/speaking/): you can’t really make any mistakes when you only have 5 minutes. It’s there, it’s gone.

I left a bit out, I’m afraid. Blame it on stress. The part I left out is about how important this “business” aspect of freelancing is — because it’s actually what’s going to determine how successful you’ll be as a freelancer. You can be the best at what you do, if you don’t know how to set your rates or find clients, you’ll starve.

So, here’s the text I wrote last night and I based my preparation upon. It isn’t a word-by-word transcript of what I said (I didn’t learn it by heart!), but it’s pretty close. Enjoy the insight into how I prepared this speech!

If I find videos and links later on, I’ll add them to the end of this post.

> I’m going to tell you a tale of inspiration, of a personal journey which led me to do things I never would have thought possible, like organising an event for freelancers from all over Europe — which I’ll tell you more about at the end of this speech. It’s not just my journey, it’s the journey of all those who have turned a passion into a living.

> Are there any freelancers or small business owners in the room? Keep those hands up. Any ex-freelancers? Aspiring freelancers, or people who’ve thought about the idea? This is about you.

> Two years ago I was sitting in this same hall. I was a middle school teacher, and I dreamed of being able to make a living out of my passion, the web — but I couldn’t see how. After LIFT in 2006, something clicked, and I saw how it could be possible. A few months later at the end of the school year, I quit my job as a teacher to be a full-time freelancer.

> It was easy at first. The phone kept ringing, and people actually wanted to pay me for stuff that didn’t feel like work. My biggest challenge was that I felt bad because I had the impression I was on holiday all the time.

> After a few weeks or months though, things became more complicated and less fun. I was charging too little, how should I set my rates? I was drowning in paperwork, I hired an accountant. I was contacted by clients I didn’t expect, like Intel who wanted to fly me all the way to the US, or a rather prominent local politician. I realised I wasn’t good at negociating and closing deals.

> Luckily I had friends in the business. I asked for their advice, and realised they had faced or were still facing the same issues. They were willing to share. I found support and learned useful things:

> – how to set a daily rate, for example. Decide how much you want to make in a month. Divide that by the number of days you have available for paid work — 10 maximum, maybe — you have your daily rate.
– I also learnt to stop being uncomfortable about how much I was charging for talks — people were paying for my expertise, not for my time

> I started learning that there is way more to freelancing than just doing the things you’re being paid for. There is a whole business aspect to freelancing which is not what draws people to become soloists — they go solo because they’re good at doing something and can get paid for it — but this business stuff is actually really important, because it’s going to determine how successful you are as a freelancer.

> When I decided to organize events, it was pretty obvious that the first one would be for freelancers. That’s Going Solo — it’s going to take place on May 16th, in Lausanne, just 30 minutes away from here by train.

> Going Solo is an occasion to gather freelancers from all over the web industry, from all over Europe and even elsewhere, and take a day off “working” to think about these business issues in depth. Seasoned freelancers like Stowe Boyd, Suw Charman, Martin Roell — and also Laura Fitton of Pistachio Consulting, which I’m announcing right now as my fourth confirmed speaker — will share their experience and dig into topics like setting your rates, negotiating and closing deals, finding clients, or better, helping clients find you, and even choosing how to work so that you actually have a work-life balance — something I’m personally struggling with these days.

> If you want to know more about Going Solo, come and talk to me or visit the website — [going-solo.net](http://going-solo.net), with a hyphen. If you have speakers to suggest, or partnerships to talk about, make yourself known. Otherwise, see you on the 16th of May!

– [interviewed by Robert Scoble on Qik](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2008/02/08/qik-interview-by-robert-scoble/)
– [interviewed by Nicholas Charbonnier on Tech Video Blog](http://techvideoblog.com/lift/stephanie-booth/)
– (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8270350768335569204)

Similar Posts:

Google et les noms [fr]

Citer le nom de quelqu’un sur un blog n’est pas un acte anodin. Sommes-nous préparés à  la responsabilité qui va avec le pouvoir de la parole publique? Quelques exemples de situations… embarrassantes.

[en] Mentioning the name of somebody in one's blog can have embarrassing consequences. People with less web presence than the blogger might find their official site behind a blog post that mentions them in passing when they google their name. How do you know if people will be happy to get your google juice or not? Bloggers are always happy with google juice... but what about the non-blogging crowd?

As people with the power to express themselves in public, bloggers have responsabilities they might not be well-prepared for. Here are a few embarrassing experiences I made: for exemple, unintentionally google-bombing people I had no hard feelings against, or not giving google juice when it would have been appreciated.

Tagging adds to the difficulty for the blogger, as tags are often chosen for private reasons, but as they are links that are indexed, they have an impact on the online presence of other people when they are of the firstname+name form.

Depuis quelque temps, je médite sur la responsabilité du blogueur qui nomme dans son blog d’autres personnes que lui, particulièrement si celui-ci a passablement de “google juice”, comme on dit en anglais. En effet, si je nomme une personne dans mon blog, il y a de fortes chances que mon article se retrouve en position assez proéminente [lorsque l’on recherche le nom](http://www.google.com/search?q=luc-olivier+erard “Un exemple de ce phénomène.”) de cette personne.

Si vous [cherchez mon nom dans Google](http://www.google.com/search?q=stephanie+booth), la grande majorité des liens sur les deux ou trois premières pages m’appartiennent — je suis responsable de la présence de mon nom dans ces pages. C’est le cas, bien entendu, parce que je suis quelqu’un qui a une très forte présence en ligne et une vie sociale “internautique” importante. (Je rassure les lecteurs qui ne me connaîtraient pas assez… ma vie sociale “non-internautique” se porte également très bien!)

Ce “pouvoir” que me donne mon blog peut être utile lorsque quelqu’un désire obtenir plus de visibilité sur le net (hop! un petit lien, ça donne un coup de pouce au référencement d’un site qui se lance, par exemple), mais c’est surtout [une petite bombe](http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombardement_Google) qui peut se déclencher de façon involontaire si je ne fais pas particulièrement attention. Par exemple, [je suis allée mercredi à  un concert que j’ai apprécié](http://steph.wordpress.com/2005/12/08/fan-experience/ “En anglais, dans mon blog personnel.”). J’évite de mettre le nom de l’artiste dans le titre de mon billet, de peur qu’il n’arrive ce qui arrive à  l’école d’arts martiaux dans laquelle je m’entraîne: [en cherchant le nom de l’école dans Google](http://www.google.com/search?q=reighikan+dojo), mon article est placé avant le site officiel de l’école. C’est un peu embarrassant!

Il y a encore bien pire: reprenons le cas de l’artiste de mercredi, dont j’écoute les chansons régulièrement depuis quelque temps. J’ai un compte [LastFM](http://www.last.fm/user/Steph-Tara/), qui établit des statistiques sur les morceaux que j’écoute avec iTunes. Je publie sur la première page de Climb to the Stars la liste des derniers morceaux écoutés; cette liste renvoie aux pages consacrées aux morceaux en question sur LastFM (par exemple: [We Will Rock You (Queen)](http://www.last.fm/music/Queen/_/We+Will+Rock+You). On peut y lire combien de personnes ont écouté le morceau, et encore bien d’autres choses fort sympathiques. Si on cherche [le nom de l’artiste (LB)](http://www.google.com/search?q=laurent+brunetti) dans Google, on voit que [la page LastFM qui lui est consacrée](http://www.last.fm/music/Laurent+Brunetti) (et qui existe par ma faute, si on veut) sort droit derrière son site officiel. Limite embarrassant, également!

Donc, je ne mets pas son nom complet dans ce billet. Premièrement, cet article ne lui est pas consacré en tant qu’artiste, ce qui m’embarrasserait triplement s’il finissait bien placé dans Google pour une recherche sur son nom. Deuxièmement, mon [Cheese Sandwich Blog](http://steph.wordpress.com/) est bien plus récent que Climb to the Stars, moins bien référencé, et avec un peu de chance il le restera, puisqu’il est consacré à  mon petit quotidien plutôt qu’à  des questions d’importance nationale comme celle que vous êtes en train de lire maintenant. Une mention “en passant” du nom de LB dans le corps d’un article ne porte pas à  conséquence sur mon “petit blog”, mais qu’en serait-il dans celui-ci? Je ne veux pas prendre le risque.

L’expérience me rend prudente. Il y a quelques mois, on m’a demandé de [retirer un nom de mon blog](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2005/06/08/incident-diplomatique/). La personne en question avait fait des photos de moi pour [l’article dans Migros Magazine](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2005/01/07/article-dans-migros-magazine/), et m’avait gentiment autorisé à  les [mettre en ligne sur Flickr](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2005/02/12/migros-magazine-photos-on-flickr/). Comme je considère qu’il faut citer ses sources et l’annoncer lorsqu’on utilise le travail de quelqu’un d’autres, j’avais consciencieusement mis son nom dans mon article et également [dans les tags des photos en question](http://flickr.com/photos/bunny/tags/migrosmagazine). Ce que je n’avais pas prévu, c’est que ces photos, qui ne sont pas forcément représentatives de son travail, et qu’elle m’a laissé à  bien plaire mettre dans mon album photos en ligne, se retrouveraient en première position lorsque l’on cherchait [son nom dans Google](http://www.google.com/search?q=vanessa+p%C3%BCntener). Ma présence en ligne étant plus forte que la sienne, j’ai littéralement fait mainmise sur son nom sans m’en rendre compte. Bien entendu, j’ai immédiatement fait de mon mieux pour réparer les choses quand elle me l’a demandé (à  juste titre!), et si j’en crois ce que je vois dans Google, les choses sont maintenant rentrées dans l’ordre. Néanmoins, expérience embarrassante (j’ai déjà  utilisé ce mot aujourd’hui?)

La généralisation des [folksnomies](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folksonomy “En anglais.”) pour catégoriser et classer l’information, à  l’aide de [“tags” ou “étiquettes”](http://technorati.com/help/tags.html), ajoute encore des occasions de commettre des impairs malgré soi. Sur [Flickr](http://flickr.com/ “Merci de prononcer comme “flicker” et non à  la suisse-allemande…”), par exemple, il est souvent d’usage d’accoler [un tag nom+prénom](http://flickr.com/photos/tags/stephaniebooth “Le résultat en ce qui me concerne.”) lorsqu’une photo représente quelqu’un. Mais lorsque je mets en ligne [une série de photos passablement floues prises après le concert dont j’ai parlé](http://www.flickr.com/photos/bunny/sets/1539556/), est-ce que je vais mettre le nom et le prénom de chaque personne sur chacune des photos? Du coup, j’ai commencé à  être un peu plus parcimonieuse dans ma distribution de tags: nom+prénom pour un petit nombre de photos, et un prénom ou un diminutif pour les autres. Le problème avec les tags, c’est que je les utilise surtout pour pouvoir m’y retrouver dans les 4000+ photos que j’ai mises en ligne. Mais en même temps, les tags sont également des liens, et sont également indexés par Google. Ma façon d’organiser mes photos va avoir un impact sur la présence en ligne d’autres personnes. Potentiellement embarrassant quand il s’agit de noms de personnes!

Comment peut-on deviner si une personne donnée préfère que son nom soit mis en avant sur le web, ou pas? Dans le doute, mieux vaut s’abstenir — c’est le message que je tente de faire passer aux ados [lors de mes conférences](http://stephanie-booth.com/offre/conférences/). Ces conférences, en passant, c’est très bien pour moi: à  force de répéter les choses aux gens, je suis forcée d’y réfléchir, et des fois je me rends compte que ma position à  certains sujets est en mouvement…

Cependant… s’abstenir n’est pas une solution sans risques. Plus récemment, alors que je préparais un site dans lequel on parlait du parcours de quelques personnes, j’ai justement évité de mettre en ligne des pages vides (ou presque) ayant pour titre le nom de quelqu’un lorsque je n’avais rien de précis à  y mettre. Ce que je n’avais pas prévu, c’est que l’absence de page signifiait également l’absence du nom dans ce qui ressemble à  la “table des matières” du site et créait un déséquilibre dans la présence en ligne des différents acteurs — ce qui m’a été reproché (à  juste titre également).

A moins que la personne nommée ne soit un blogueur, je dirais que mettre un nom dans un billet est une chose délicate. Plus ou moins délicate, selon que le nom est dans le corps du billet, sur du texte lié, dans le titre du billet, ou pire, dans le titre de la page. Plus ou moins délicat également selon la visibilité du blog dans lequel c’est fait.

Les gens vont-ils nous en vouloir d’avoir cité leur nom? Vont-ils nous en vouloir de ne pas l’avoir fait, ou pas assez? Il n’est pas toujours possible de vérifier auparavant avec la personne en question. De plus, même si on vérifie, la personne est-elle pleinement des conséquences de l’une ou l’autre route? Une vérification sérieuse ne pourra manquer de s’accompagner d’une explication du fonctionnement du référencement, ce qui risque de crisper certains… à  tort.

Voici à  mon sens démontrée une nouvelle fois l’utilité d’une forte présence en ligne. Vous pouvez mettre mon nom où vous voulez, ça ne me dérange pas, car je sais que sur Google, c’est moi qui possède mon nom.

Ce que démontre également ce genre de situation, c’est la responsabilité qui va avec ce que j’appelle la “parole publique”. La parole publique est un pouvoir, et avant internet, ce pouvoir était en principe limité aux personnes dont c’était le métier (journalistes, politiciens, écrivains). Avec internet, ce pouvoir se démocratise, et c’est une bonne chose. Mais nous sommes peu préparés à  la responsabilité qui va avec. Avec la façon dont fonctionnent les moteurs de recherche comme Google, on ne peut plus écrire sans avoir présent à  l’esprit les conséquences que cela pourrait avoir pour le référencement d’autres sites.

Similar Posts: