Browsed by
Tag: Software and Tools

Seminar on Social Media Adoption in the Enterprise [en]

Seminar on Social Media Adoption in the Enterprise [en]

[fr] Dernier jour pour s'inscrire au séminaire sur les stratégies d'adoption des nouveaux médias dans l'entreprise organisé par mon amie (et néanmoins experte de renommée internationale) Suw Charman-Anderson. C'est à Londres, ce vendredi.

My friend [Suw Charman-Anderson](http://strange.corante.com/) is organising a seminar this Friday in London on the
adoption of social tools in the enterprise: [Making Social Tools Ubiquitous](http://fruitful-socialtoolsadoption.eventbrite.com/). There are still some
places left. The sign-up deadline is tomorrow — act fast.

You’ll find a description of this seminar below. This is a chance to
learn about social tools in the enterprise directly from a world-class
expert who has practical experience introducing social tools in
various businesses. Want a peek? here are [notes I took from her talk
last year](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/10/04/fowa-enterprise-adoption-of-social-software-suw-charman/) at the Future of Web Apps conference.

> **Overview**
> You may have heard that social tools – such as wikis, blogs, social bookmarking and social networking – can help you improve business communications, increase collaboration and nurture innovation. And with open source tools, you can pilot projects easily and cheaply. But what do you do if people won’t use them? And how do you grow from a pilot to company-wide use?

> Social media expert Suw Charman-Anderson will take a practical look at the adoption of social tools within your business. During the day you will create a scalable and practical social media adoption strategy and discuss your own specific issues with the group. By the end of the seminar you will have a clear set of next steps to take apply to your own collaborative tools project.

> **The setting**
> Fruitful Seminars take place in an intimate setting, with no more than 9 people attending, so you to get the very most out of the day. The are held at the luxurious One Alfred Place, and include tea & coffee, and lunch from the restaurant.

> **Who should come?**

>* CXO executives
* managers
* team leaders
* decision makers
* social media practitioners
* social media vendors

> Or anyone in situations similar to these:

> * You have already installed some social tools for internal communications and collaboration, but aren’t getting the take-up you had hoped for.
* You have successfully completed a pilot and want to roll-out to the rest of the company.
* You want to start using social tools and need a strategy for fostering adoption.
* You sell social software or services and want to understand how your clients can foster adoption of your tool.

For more information, check out these recent posts Suw wrote:

– [Fruitful Seminars: Making Social Tools Ubiquitous](http://strange.corante.com/archives/2008/05/29/fruitful_seminars_making_social_tools_ubiquitous.php)
– [Q: What does promoting an event have in common with the adoption of social tools in the enterprise?](http://strange.corante.com/archives/2008/06/17/q_what_does_promoting_an_event_have_in_common_with_the_adoption_of_social_tools_in_the_enterprise.php)
– [Why isn’t social software spreading like wildfire through business?](http://strange.corante.com/archives/2008/06/20/why_isnt_social_software_spreading_like_wildfire_through_business.php)

The second Fruitful Seminar, [held by Lloyd Davis](http://perfectpath.wordpress.com/2008/06/17/mastering-social-media/), will take place on July 16th: [Mastering Social Media](http://fruitful-masteringsocialmedia.eventbrite.com/).

Not for you? tell your friends about it. Not this time, but want to keep an eye on what Suw, Leisa and Lloyd are doing with Fruitful Seminars? [sign up for their newsletter](http://groups.google.com/group/fruitful-seminars/subscribe). Otherwise… time to [sign up](http://fruitful-socialtoolsadoption.eventbrite.com/)!

Similar Posts:

Becoming a Professional Networker: Tags in Address Book OSX Needed! [en]

Becoming a Professional Networker: Tags in Address Book OSX Needed! [en]

[fr] Besoin, de toute urgence: plugin Address Book.app permettant de taguer ses contacts.

For some time now, I’ve been aware that I’m becoming a professional networker. Almost all I do to promote [Going Solo](http://going-solo.net), for example, relies on my reputation and the connections I have to other people.

Now, I’ve never been somebody to collect contacts just for the sake of collecting contacts, but until [LeWeb3 last year](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/12/12/news-from-leweb3/), I had just been content with butterflying around and stacking business cards somewhere near by desk. At LeWeb3, when I started telling people about Going Solo, I also started realising that the people I met and contacts I made were going to have more importance for my business than before.

And if I’ve learnt something during these last two months, it’s the importance of getting back to people. I’ve figured out how [iGTD and GMail](http://seesmic.com/v/32zdGimgth) can play nice together to help me with that, but it’s not sufficient. I need to keep track of who I’ve asked what, of who can help me with what, who has this or that connection. And yes, I have too many people in my business network to keep everything in my head.

As I explain in the video above, the lovely [Cathy Brooks](http://www.otherthanthat.com/) put me on the right track: use Address Book.app. I don’t really need to keep all the contact details related to a person close at hand (ie, phone number, e-mail, etc.) because I have that in LinkedIn, Facebook, GMail address book, or on business cards. I’m not interested in keeping an exhaustive repository of all the contact details of all the people I’ve met. What I’m interested in, however, is keeping the names of these people somewhere I can attach meaningful information to them.

Where we met. What we talked about. Stuff that’ll help me remember who people are.

So, I started simply adding names (Firstname Lastname) into my OSX address book, along with a few words in the Notes field. The nice thing about the Notes field is that you don’t have to toggle edit mode on to add stuff in the Notes. So, of course, I started using the notes field to tag people. Not too bad (smart folders allow me to “pull out” people with a certain tag) but not great either, because tags get mixed up with notes, and it’s a bit clunky.

Somebody suggested I create a custom “Tags” field (a “Names” type field is fine). Unfortunately, though this looks like a good idea at first, it fails because you have to edit a contact each time you want to add tags. Also, you can’t create a smart folder based on the contents of that field — you need to search through the whole card. Clunky too.

I don’t know how to write Address Book plugins, but I know they exist, and I have an idea for a plugin that would save my life (and probably countless others) and which doesn’t seem very complex to build. If there’s anybody out there listening… here’s a chance to be a hero.

I want a “tag your contacts” plugin for Address Book.app. What would it do? Simple, add a “Tags” field that behaves similarly to the “Notes” field. That would allow me to separate notes and tags — they aren’t quite the same thing, don’t you agree?

In addition to that, the plugin could display a list of all contacts tagged “thisorthat” when you double-clicked the tag. That would be nice.

Does anybody else want this? Does it already exist? Would anybody be willing to build it? (If other people are interested, I’d be willing to suggest we pool some cash to donate to the kind person building this life-saving plugin.)

Similar Posts:

Please Don't Be Rude, coComment. I Loved You. [en]

Please Don't Be Rude, coComment. I Loved You. [en]

[fr] J'étais une inconditionnelle de la première heure de coComment. Je les ai même eus comme clients. Aujourd'hui j'ai le coeur lourd, car après le désastre de la version 2.0 "beta", le redesign du site qui le laisse plus confus qu'avant, les fils RSS qui timent out, le blog sans âme et les pubs qui clignotent, je me retrouve avec de grosses bannières autopromotionnelles dans mon tumblelog, dans lequel j'ai intégré le flux RSS de mes commentaires.

Just a little earlier this evening, my heart sank. It sank because of this:

Steph's Tumblr - rude cocomment

That is a screenshot of [my Tumblr](http://steph.tumblr.com). And what [coComment](http://cocomment.com) is doing here — basically, inserting a huge self-promotional banner in their RSS feed — is really rude.

I’m really sad, because I used to love coComment. I was involved (not much, but still) [early on](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2006/02/04/cocomment-enfin-public/) and was a first-hour fan. They [were even my client for over six months](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2006/04/13/im-working-for-cocomment/), during which I acted as a community manager, gave feedback on features to the team, and [wrote a whole bunch of blog posts](http://climbtothestars.org/categories/cocomment/). This ended, sadly, [when coComment finally incorporated](http://blog.cocomment.com/2007/01/12/launch-notice/), because we couldn’t reach an agreement as to the terms of my engagement.

Inserting content in the RSS feeds is only the latest in a series of disappointments I’ve had with the service. I used to have a sidebar widget to show the last comments I’d made all over the place on my blog, but I removed it at some point — I can’t remember when — because it had stopped working. I tried adding it again, but for some reason WordPress can’t find the feed. It seemed very slow when I tried to access it directly, so maybe it’s timing out — and I think I recall that is what made me remove it in the first place.

I’m sad also to see blinking ads on the coComment site, confusing navigation, pages with [click here](http://www.cocomment.com/tools/owner) links, and [a blog which has no soul](http://blog.cocomment.com/), filled with post after post of press-release-like “we won this contest”, “we’re sponsoring this event”, “version xyz released”, “we were here too” — all too often on behalf of a mostly faceless “coComment Team”. CoComment used to have something going, but to me it now seems like an exciting promise that lost its way somewhere along the line.

[Last August](http://blog.cocomment.com/2007/08), the [version](http://www.myopenletters.com/2007/08/08/smooth-move-cocomments/) [2.0](http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa/archives/2007/08/the_last_week_h.html) [beta](http://blog.fupps.com/2007/08/21/cocomment-apologizes/) [disaster](http://blog.cocomment.com/2007/08/21/were-sorry/) made me cringe with embarrassment for my former love (who on earth takes all their users [back to beta](http://blog.cocomment.com/2007/08/03/cocomment-v2-beta-update/) when 1.0 was stable?) and left many blogs paralyzed, including my own. I started writing a blog post, at the time, which I never published, as other things got in the way. Here’s what I’d written:

> I reinstalled the extension yesterday (I’d removed it a few months ago because I suspected it might be involved in a lot of browser hang-ups) but had to uninstall it a couple of hours later:

> – too many non-comment textareas get the coco-bar
– blacklisting seems broken
– pop-up requesting info confirmation for website blocking form submission of non-comment forms, even though coco-bar was removed AND extension was deactivated for the page.

> It would be nice to be able to read some clear and detailed information about these issues and their resolution on the blog, so that I know when it’s worth trying the extension again.

> Also, a **major** issue is that when the coComment server isn’t responding, people cannot leave comments on integrated/enhanced blogs (like this one, or my personal blog). I had to remove coComment integration from my blog so that coComment downtime doesn’t prevent my readers from leaving comments.

***Update:** in case this wasn’t clear first time around, these problems have since then been solved and [coComment apologized for the mess](http://blog.cocomment.com/2007/08/21/were-sorry/). It doesn’t erase the pain, though.*

So, coComment — and Matt — are you listening?

You’re in the process of alienating somebody who was one of your most passionate users — if you haven’t lost me already. I cared. I forgave. I waited. I hoped. But right now, I don’t have the impression you care much about me. I’ve seen excuses, I’ve even seen justifications, and now I see large ugly banners in my Tumblr. What happened to you?

*You’ll have understood, I hope, that this is not just about me. This is about the people who use your service. The service you provide is for us, right?*

Similar Posts:

Being My Own Travel Agent With Kayak [en]

Being My Own Travel Agent With Kayak [en]

[fr] En mars, je vais en Irlande, puis à Austin (Texas), puis à San Francisco. Ça fait pas mal de vols à organiser. L'agence de voyage que j'ai contactée me propose un circuit à CHF 2800. En utilisant Kayak, j'arrive (non sans mal, sueur, et heures investies) à faire le tour pour CHF 1650.

Cet article est le récit de la façon dont j'ai procédé.

I have some **serious travel** planned for March.

First, I go to Cork, Ireland, for [Blogtalk](http://2008.blogtalk.net/) and the preceding [WebCamp on Social Network Portability](http://webcamp.org/SocialNetworkPortability), from 2nd to 4th.

Then, I head for Austin, Texas for [SXSW Interactive](http://2008.sxsw.com/interactive/), from 7th-11th.

I’ll be **speaking** in both places.

As I’m in the States, I’ll then head out to spend two weeks or so in San Francisco. Here are what my travel dates and destinations look like:

– 1st: GVA-ORK (ORK is Cork, yes, funny)
– 6th: ORK-AUS
– 12th: AUS-SFO
– 25th: SFO-GVA

I chose the 25th to go back because it seems to be the cheapest day around there. The other dates are fixed by hotel or event constraints.

After fooling around with [Kayak.com](http://kayak.com) for a fair number of hours, and finding it a little confusing (I’ll detail below in what way), I caved in and **called a travel agent** in Lausanne to ask them to sort it out for them.

They got back to me, speedily and kindly, but with a surprising price tag: **2800 CHF** for the whole thing. That’s $2400 for those of you who like dollars.

Now, even though I wasn’t very happy with what I came up on Kayak, I had figured out that this trip would cost me around about 1200$. Not the double.

So, **back to Kayak**. In the process, I’m starting to get the hang of how to do searches for long, nasty, complicated journeys, so I thought I’d share it with you.

A side issue before I start, though: flights to and from the USA have a **much more generous luggage allowance** than flights elsewhere (20kg + cabin luggage). If the first leg of a journey to the USA is inside Europe, though, you still get the “US” luggage allowance for that flight. I was hoping I could make things work out to have the more generous luggage allowance for the GVA-ORK part of my trip too, as I tend to have trouble travelling light (particularly for 3 weeks). But it seems that won’t happen.

As I understand it from the kind explanations a few people have given me, the GVA-ORK part of my journey is considered a completely separate one from ORK-AUS, AUS-SFO, and then SFO-GVA. In short, I’m dealing with **four separate flights**.

So, let’s do the obvious thing first, and **ask Kayak.com to do all the work**. My dates are fixed, but I’m open to the idea of using nearby airports. This is what I gave Kayak.com:

Kayak search: GVA-ORK-AUS-SFO-GVA

And here is what I got:

Kayak.com GVA-ORK-AUS-SFO-GVA

Oops. It seems Geneva dropped off the map. If I select the “neighbouring” airport LYS (Lyon), I get this. Slightly more encouraging, but…

Kayak.com: GVA-ORK-AUS-SFO-GVA

…slightly expensive. Roughly what my travel agent told me, actually. Gosh, I wonder which part of the journey is costing so much? **Let’s try and break things down.**

**First, GVA-ORK:**

Kayak.com GVA - ORK

Wow, is that their best price? $384 and 9 hours of travel to go from Switzerland to Ireland? I should be able to find something better. So, I hunted around a bit on my own. I know I can get to London for around $100 or less with [easyJet](http://easyjet.com), so what about the other low-costs? From the Cork airport site, I got a [list of airlines flying there](http://www.corkairport.com/flight_info/airlines.html). Then I went to individual airline sites — I’ll pass you the details, save to say that [RyanAir](http://ryanair.com) has got some “virtually free” flights (1 penny + taxes) but as they only allow 15kg of check-in luggage (I can make sacrifices and try to stick to 20, but 15 is really low), flight + excess luggage fee actually comes down to not-that-cheap.

Oh, wait a sec! Let’s enlist Kayak’s help for this. Here are GVA-LON flights, according to Kayak:

Kayak.com GVA - LON

That’s helpful, actually. I wouldn’t have thought to check [BA](http://ba.com). The flight is way too early, though. And Kayak.com now gives results with European low-cost airlines — I don’t recall it did this early December when I first tried.

What about LON-ORK?

Kayak.com LON - ORK

I removed RyanAir from the results (they were the cheapest, around $48 — plus extra luggage tax!), and the winner is… [Aer Lingus](http://aerlingus.com)!

So, if I manage to get the timings right, and accept that I’ll have to pick up my luggage and check in again in London, I should be able to get a better deal than the $384 Kayak suggested “out of the box”.

Oh, another idea. Let’s tell Kayak I’m flying through London, and see what happens. Here are the results for GVA-LON-ORK:

Kayak.com GVA - LON - ORK

Still no luck. The first flight is the same as the one I got when I asked for GVA-ORK. Clearly, Kayak introduces constraints (like… airlines must be working together) when asked for a trip. That probably explains why my total trip seems so horrendously expensive.

Right, now we’ve dealt (more or less — at least there seems to be hope) with the first part of the journey, let’s look at the rest.

**ORK-AUS-SFO-GVA:**

ORK-AUS: $509

Kayak.com ORK - AUS

AUS-SFO: $125

Kayak.com AUS - SFO

SFO-GVA: $530

Adding all that up, we’re quite far from the $2400 my travel agent or Kayak suggest for the whole flight.

Now, let’s dig in a little further. How about I ask Kayak for ORK-AUS-SFO-GVA? I’ve already identified that the GVA-ORK part was problematic, so maybe… maybe:

Kayak.com ORK - AUS - SFO - GVA

$1029! And all with American Airlines! That sounds nice. Add to that a bit less than $200 for the GVA-ORK bit, and I should manage to do all this flying for roughly $1200. Much more reasonable (though still a big hole in my bank account credit card, given the sad state of my finances these days).

So, ready for the details? Because, no, in case you were wondering, the fun doesn’t stop here. Sick around, there’s still work to do.

**First, GVA-LON-ORK.**

London has a problem: it has too many airports. Aer Lingus fly out of LHR to Cork, so ideally, I should plan to arrive there. I don’t think I want to go through the fun of commuting from one airport to another if I can avoid it.

That unfortunately rules out easyJet, who don’t fly to LHR. They fly to LGW, Luton, Stansted, but not LHR. So, let’s check out BA, who were actually cheaper (though at an ungodly hour, and for LGW).

BA: GVA-LHR

Right, so for 144 CHF, I get to fly out around 10am, which is actually quite nice. I land around 11am. Let’s look at Aer Lingus flights to ORK, then:

Aer Lingus: LHR-ORK

I’m very tempted to take the 14:05 flight instead of the 18:05 one, **but**. That would leave me with only 3 hours in LHR to get my luggage, go from terminal 1 to terminal 4, and check in again. The London crew on Twitter tells me it’s a little tight, though others seem to think it’s OK.

So, well, that would be it for the first part of the journey.

Now for the rest.

**Then, ORK-AUS-SFO-GVA.**

Here are the details I get from Kayak for this multi-city journey:

Kayak.com ORK-AUS-SFO-GVA 1029$

As you can see, American Airlines seem to like Chicago airport, ORD. [Dennis Howlett](http://twitter.com/dahowlett) warns me against going through that airport, but it seems the other options are going to cost me an extra $1000.

But that’s not all. What exactly are the “layovers” here? I’d assume they are plane changes. But 55 minutes in Chicago and 1h35 in Brussels on my way back don’t really seem to allow time for that. Chances are I’d miss the connection — but then why would Kayak.com (and AA!) suggest this kind of combination?

It’s not the end of the world if I get home a day late, so I guess that for $1000, I’ll take my chances.

Let’s not stop there, though, shall we? I decided to dig a bit deeper into all this. See, for example, I tried asking Kayak.com about:

AUS-SFO-GVA: $1669

Kayak.com AUS - SFO - GVA

Why isn’t Kayak coming up with one of the (obviously cheaper) combinations for the SFO-GVA leg? Why is BA suddenly the cheapest option? I don’t get it.

See, for example, this flight option for SFO-GVA, $550, is much more exciting than the AA one via ORD and Brussels:

Kayak.com: SFO-GVA

Just one change in Newark. And it’s a shorter overall flight, too.

That means I need to get the ORK-AUS-SFO part separate. Let’s look at it now:

Kayak.com ORK-AUS-SFO

The cheapest deal is $624 with AA and Frontier, which is an immediate (and logical! what a surprise!) combination of the two cheapest deals for ORK-AUS and AUS-SFO taken separately. I don’t seem to gain anything (financially) by booking them together.

Now, the problem here is that the flight times are really long (20h). I’m quite tempted to force my journey through some European city other than London and see what happens.

A quick trip to the Austin airport site seems to say there are [no direct flights there outside the US](http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/austinairport/nonstops.htm). I can’t find that kind of information for DFW, unfortunately. I’m keeping an eye on [DFW](http://www.dfwairport.com/) because I could land there and take a road trip to Austin with a friend. It’s 3.5 hours on the road, though, so I need a flight that lands early enough.

For example, let’s take Dublin, as I’m already in Ireland.

Here are Kayak flights from DUB to AUS: most interesting deal $484 with Delta for a 19h flight:

Kayak.com: DUB-AUS

Come to think of it, you know what I’d like? I’d like to be able to place all the flights on a chart, with for example “price” on the x-axis and “total flight duration” on the y-axis. I’d be willing to pay $50 extra or so to cut of a certain number of hours of travel, but as of now there is no way to visualise this kind of thing easily. The “Matrix” tab in Kayak has a promising name, but all it does is give best price and number of stops per airline. Not very exciting.

What about ORK-DUB? Well, the fine folks at Blogtalk recommend [Aer Arann](http://2008.blogtalk.net/travelling) (they have a great “travelling” page, btw, I’ll have to take example on them for [Going Solo](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/12/14/announcing-going-solo/):

Aer Arann: ORK-DUB

Cheap flight, $36. What would Kayak say?

Kayak.com: ORK-DUB

Well, RyanAir is cheaper but I don’t want them, and the Aer Arann flights are there, but a bit more expensive than what I found. Hidden costs, maybe? Or maybe just an update glitch — I’m aware it’s difficult to keep everything perfectly in sync.

Gah. This is turning into another nasty headache.

Let’s go back to letting Kayak take care of ORK-AUS-SFO. I had a look at flights from [Shannon](http://www.shannonairport.com/), but the price difference is not worth the couple of hours by bus to get there. I also considered SAT (San Antonio) but it’s really out of Austin, so not interesting. I’m willing to fly in another airport than SFO though.

Sidenote: this is where I discover I can “favorite” flights in Kayak. I should have started doing that hours ago. So, here’s the flight I’m favoriting for the ORK-AUS segment. I don’t want to land at 12:15am in Austin, so the choice is easy to make. Will have to get up early in Cork, though. Ugh.

Kayak.com: ORK-AUS favorite

You know what would be really cool? If I search for ORK-AUS-SFO, I’d like Kayak to let me know which flight combinations contain that flight I’ve favorited. I wonder if it does that. Let’s see! But before that, I’ll go and favorite the flight I want for heading over to San Francisco. So, here is what Kayak gave me for that segment, remember?

Kayak.com AUS - SFO

The cheapest flight is $125, but if you have a close look, you’ll see that all these are either dreadfully early, or quite late. I’d rather leave sometime later in the morning. Luckily, Kayak provides a “filter” that allows me to select that. (Remember, earlier on, I was wondering why Kayak was suggesting routes with 55min stopovers? Well, there’s a “stopover length” filter too that I could have used to avoid that.) Here’s what happens if I decide to leave between 8 and 10am:

Kayak.com: AUS-SFO Flight Time filter

For roughly $200, I get to sleep a bit more. This is another case where the price/something-or-other graph would come in handy: it would help me visualise how much I have to pay to leave later. (I’m learning to factor in cab fares and stuff like that when making flight decisions.)

So, back to our combined ORK-AUS-SFO trip:

Kayak.com: ORK-AUS-SFO best choice

By playing with the time sliders for flights 1 and 2, I managed to filter out the flights that didn’t contain my two favourites (at no surprise, Kayak doesn’t tell me that this “multiple flight” actually contains a single flight that I favourited… too bad). Result: $695 and decent flying times.

**So, let’s recap.** (I’m going to be doing the actual booking tomorrow, it’s getting late and I’m tired, which is usually a recipe for mistakes. Also, the prices the airlines and Kayak give could be slightly different, so this is an approximation.)

GVA-LHR: BA, $125
LHR-ORK: Aer Lingus, $60

That’s $185 for me to go to Cork.

ORK-AUS-SFO: AA and Frontier, $695

SFO-GVA: United and Qatar, $550

Total: $1430 = 1650CHF

That’s a bit more than what it seemed I’d get away with at first, but there are less stopovers and the flying times are nicer than the cheapest deal. That’s worth a couple hundred $.

So, thanks Kayak. That’s more than 1000CHF less than my travel agent came up with. But God, did I have to work hard for it. There is definitely room for improvement in the business of helping people sort out their travels.

While I was writing this post and [twittering about my trials](http://twitter.com/stephtara), [Bill O’Donnel](http://egopoly.com/) (find him [on Twitter](http://twitter.com/agentbillo), he’s the Chief Architect at Kayak!) sent me a message saying he [wanted to read my post](http://twitter.com/agentbillo/statuses/524594472) when I was done. He also added that he was [forwarding my twitters to the UI team](http://twitter.com/agentbillo/statuses/524596032). So, guys, hope you enjoy the free [experiential marketing](http://climbtothestars.org/focus/experiential-marketing/)! In a way, only — it’s not really an experiential marketing campaign because nobody asked me to do anything, but this is typically the kind of stuff I *would* write up in such a campaign, and an example of *authentic user behaviour* that experiential marketing “re-creates”.

So anyway, hope you enjoy this tale of user experience. And I also hope my fellow travellers will find useful input here to help them sort out their travels.

Thanks to everybody who answered or simply put up with my numerous questions and tweets during the process of sorting out this trip.

Similar Posts:

Advice for a Translating Tool [en]

Advice for a Translating Tool [en]

[fr] Quelques conseils pour mettre en place un outil de traduction d'interfaces en ligne.

I was asked for some advice for a soon-to-be-released online interface translation tool. *(Hint: maybe my advice would be more useful earlier on in the project…)* Here’s what I said:

1. allow for regional forking of languages. e.g. there was a merciless
war on the French wikipedia between the French and the Belgians over
[“Endive” which is called “Chicon”](http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endive) in Belgium. One is not more right than
another, and these differences can be important.

2. remember that words which are the same in English can have two
different translations in other languages. e.g. “Upload” can be
translated as “Téléchargez” (imperative verb form) or “Téléchargement”
(noun)

3. if you’re doing some sort of string-based thing (which I suppose
you are) like [translate.wordpress.com](http://translate.wordpress.com), let people see what they’re
translating in context. (See the interface in English, with the place
the string is in highlighted, and then see the interface in French,
with the string highlighted too.)

*Note: yes, this person had already watched [my Google Tech Talk on languages online](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/07/10/talk-languages-on-the-internet-at-google-tomorrow/) — and yes, I’m going to collect my language stuff somewhere neat on a static page at some point.*

Similar Posts:

BarCamp Lausanne: former des « webmasters 2.0 »? [fr]

BarCamp Lausanne: former des « webmasters 2.0 »? [fr]

[en] Discussing the differences between skills of the old-school webmaster and the "webmaster 2.0" (eeek!) -- basically, a profile for the one to take care of site maintenance once we've done shiny 2.0 things with WordPress and plugins. It's a different skillset, and I'm not certain it's the same kind of person.

Samedi, à l’occasion du [premier](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/09/06/barcamp-a-lausanne-le-29-septembre/) [BarCamp Lausanne](http://barcamp.ch/BarCampLausanne), j’ai animé une discussion sur l’avenir du métier de webmaster. Je pense que c’est un rôle qui se voit profondément transformé par l’arrivée du tout l’attirail « 2.0 », et qui est donc effectivement [en voie d’extinction](http://blog.profession-web.ch/index.php/348-le-metier-de-webmaster-est-en-voie-d-extinction) tel que nous le connaissons encore aujourd’hui. Je pense cependant qu’il reste une place pour ce que j’appellerai le « webmaster 2.0 », quelque part entre les consultants, développeurs, designeurs, professionnels de la communication ou autres qui se partage le gâteau 2.0.

Cela fait quelques années maintenant que « j’aide [les gens](http://stephanie-booth.com/particuliers/) à [faire des sites](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/04/28/pouvez-vous-nous-faire-un-site-role-du-consultant/) » (c’est malheureusement principalement comme ça que je suis perçue — j’ai encore de la marge côté efforts en communication). Je me rends compte que si des outils magnifiques comme WordPress permettent de se libérer du webmaster pour de nombreuses tâches (c’est en effet un « argument de vente » : plus besoin de s’adresser au webmaster pour mettre à jour le contenu de votre site), ils ne sont tout de même pas autosuffisants : ils cessent des fois de fonctionner pour des raisons mystérieuses, il faut les mettre à jour, installer des plug-ins, faire des modifications mineures… Bref, ils requièrent de la maintenance.

Mon point de départ pour cette discussion lors de BarCamp était de mettre en regard les compétences du « webmaster » (j’expliquerai tout soudain les guillemets) avec celles qui seraient à mon avis nécessaires pour la maintenance de sites simples « 2.0 ». Ce rôle (je préfère parler de rôle plutôt que de « métier ») de webmaster disparaît-il, ou bien évolue-t-il ? S’il évolue, les compétences sont-elles assez similaires pour que ce rôle soit repris par la même personne, ou bien ce qu’il requiert un « background » différent ?

Donc, « webmaster » entre guillemets. Inévitablement, je vais parler ici en utilisant des clichés. Les webmasters qui me lisent ne se reconnaîtront probablement pas, et je le sais. Ce que je décris, c’est un des rôles un peu stéréotypés qui intervient dans l’écologie du site Web. Ce rôle (tel qu’il m’intéresse pour cette discussion) se retrouve dans des petites structures (petites entreprises, associations). Il y ait des professionnels qui portent le titre de « webmaster » dans des entreprises plus grandes ou avec plus de moyens, et qui font un travail qui n’a rien à voir avec ce que je décris ici. Le « webmaster » auquel je pense n’est souvent pas un professionnel de la branche, et ne fait probablement pas ça à temps plein. C’est quelqu’un que l’on paye à l’heure ou sous forme de forfait pour l’année, et dont on utilise les services de façon plus ou moins régulière.

[Sandrine](http://blog.profession-web.ch/) a eu la gentillesse de spontanément filmer le début de ma présentation, [disponible en vidéo chez Google](http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2421266089139465575&hl=fr). Il y en a pour treize minutes, je vous laisse regarder si le coeur vous en dit.

Malheureusement, cela s’arrête lorsque la conversation démarre (le morceau le plus intéressant, à mon avis !) — j’imagine que des impératifs techniques sont entrés en ligne de compte…

Pour simplifier, même si je n’aime pas les étiquettes, j’ai proposé que l’on parle de « webmaster 1.0 » et de « webmaster 2.0 ».

**Webmaster 1.0**

– FTP
– mise à jour de contenu
– HTML/DreamWeaver
– scripts Perl/PHP
– images (redimensionner, insérer dans HTML)
– design (un peu)
– mailing-lists/newsletter

**Webmaster 2.0**

– mises à jour (versions) des « CMS 2.0 »: WordPress, Drupal, MediaWiki, PhpBB…
– choisir et changer des thèmes/skins
– compréhension de base du fonctionnement d’un CMS (applications Web PHP/MySQL, quelques notions de base de données, utilisation de PhpMyAdmin…)
– (X)HTML/CSS, standards Web
– installer des plug-ins

En fait, le rôle du webmaster 2.0 correspond *un peu* à celui d’un apprenti sysadmin. Cela reste un rôle technique, la gestion de la communauté étant à mon avis du ressort des personnes qui vont créer le contenu.

Ma motivation principale à tenter de définir ce rôle est en fait économique : bien sûr, un développeur ou un consultant un peu branché technique (comme moi) est tout à fait capable de remplir ce rôle de webmaster 2.0. Mais il n’est pas nécessaire d’avoir toutes les compétences d’un développeur ou d’un consultant pour faire ce genre de travail. Cela signifie qu’il ne devrait pas être nécessaire pour le client de payer du travail de maintenance relativement simple (même s’il requiert des compétences techniques qui dépassent celles de l’utilisateur lambda) à des tarifs de consulting ou de développement. Et personnellement, ce n’est pas (plus !) le genre de tâche que j’ai envie de faire pour gagner ma vie.

Mon expérience est que malheureusement, les personnes en place à jouer le rôle de webmaster 1.0 peinent souvent à acquérir par elles-mêmes les compétences nécessaires pour assurer la maintenance des sites « 2.0 » plus complexes techniquement. Si le webmaster 1.0 est souvent autodidacte, les compétences « 2.0 » sont à mon avis plus difficile à acquérir par soi-même — à moins d’être justement tellement immergé dans ces technologies que l’on est déjà un développeur.

Qui donc pourraient être ces « webmasters 2.0 » qui manquent à mon avis cruellement dans le paysage romand ? Peut-être serait-il intéressant de mettre sur pied une formation continue pour « webmasters 1.0 » ? Le problème avec ça à mon avis, ce que beaucoup de webmasters le sont à titre bénévole ou presque. Est-ce qu’il y a des CFC qui pourraient inclure ce genre de compétences à leur programme ? Pour le moment, la solution qui me paraît le plus immédiatement réaliste est de considérer ce rôle comme une étape de l’évolution professionnelle de quelqu’un. À ce moment-là, cela pourrait être un travail idéal pour des personnes en cours de formation.

[Quentin Gouédard](http://quentin.unblog.fr/), à la tête de l’hébergeur [unblog.fr](http://unblog.fr/), a suggéré lors de la discussion que ce genre de service pourrait être intégrée à une offre d’hébergement. C’est une idée que je trouve très intéressante.

J’aimerais revenir sur un pont qui a occupé pas mal notre discussion : il y un certain nombre de tâches de maintenance, qui même si elles sont techniques, sont encore relativement simples, et qui ne nécessitent à mon sens pas de faire intervenir des développeurs. Je pense qu’à l’avenir, on va avoir de plus en plus besoin — par intermittence probablement — de personnes ayant cet éventail de compétences, sans pour autant qu’ils aient une spécialisation plus poussée. Je pense aussi que (durant les quelques années à venir en tout cas) ces personnes devront avoir une présence locale. Le contact humain direct reste important, surtout pour des associations ou entreprises dont le métier premier n’est pas le Web.

J’ai conscience que ma réflexion n’est pas encore tout à fait aboutie. J’envisage en ce moment de former deux ou trois étudiants à qui je pourrais confier la maintenance (ou tout du moins une partie de celle-ci) des sites que je mets en place avec mes clients, pour un tarif raisonnable. Je ne peux en effet pas proposer à mes clients des solutions pour leur présence en ligne, si je n’ai rien à leur offrir côté maintenance. La maintenance ne m’intéresse personnellement pas en tant que tel, mais j’avoue ne pas avoir connaissance dans la région d’individus ou d’entreprises dont les compétences sont satisfaisantes et qui ne facturent pas des tarifs de développement (sauf ceux dont on a parlé, Samuel, et c’est justement la solution « étudiante »).

Avec un peu de chance, mes informations sont incomplètes, et quelqu’un va laisser un mot dans les commentaires en proposant ses services 🙂

Y a-t-il un webmaster (2.0) dans la salle ?

Ils parlent de cette discussion sur leur blog:

– [Sandrine: Le métier de webmaster est en voie d’extinction](http://blog.profession-web.ch/index.php/348-le-metier-de-webmaster-est-en-voie-d-extinction)
– [Compte-rendu du BarCamp Lausanne première édition](http://www.reivilo.net/2007/09/29/compte-rendu-du-barcamp-lausanne-premiere-edition/)
– [Quentin: BarCamp Lausanne](http://quentin.unblog.fr/2007/10/01/barcamp-lausanne/)

Similar Posts:

BarCamp Lausanne: Introduction à Django (Mathieu Meylan) [fr]

BarCamp Lausanne: Introduction à Django (Mathieu Meylan) [fr]

[en] An introduction to Django at BarCamp Lausanne.

*J’ai pas mal entendu parler de [Django](http://www.djangoproject.com/), mais encore pas eu le temps de m’y intéresser. C’est l’occasion! Voici mes notes de la session.*

[Mathieu](http://www.matinfo.ch/) travaille chez ElectronLibre, et suit le développement de Django depuis 5 mois.

BarCamp Lausanne 13

– objectifs et intérêts de Django
– mécanisme
– parcours d’une requête
– …

Framework web. Permet, grâce à bibliothèques, de développer du web de façon plus rapide. Django permet de segmenter la conception du site. En gros, on gagne du temps, c’est assez facile à apprendre. Adapté à tous types de site web (y compris multilangue). *steph-note: j’aimerais voir comment ça marche!*

Django, en fait, c’est comme Rails pour Ruby, c’est un framework Python. Rails est un peu plus complexe à apprendre et intègre AJAX.

[présentation des caractéristiques techniques de Django]

Le niveau requis en Python dépend de la complexité de l’application qu’on veut développer.

Exemples:

– http://www.lawrence.com/
– http://www.washingtonpost.com/
– http://chicagocrime.org/
– http://www.tabblo.com/studio/
– http://wattwatt.com/

*steph-note: exemples de code, ça a l’air abordable.*

Certaines vues sont si courantes (vue par date, ajout/mise à jour/suppression) qu’elles sont inclues telles quelles dans Django — donc pas besoin d’écrire de code pour les utiliser.

Possible de produire autre chose que du HTML/XML: e-mails, texte brut…

*steph-note: en voyant tout ça, je me demande combien de travail ça nécessiterait de re-créer WordPress (par exemple) avec un framework comme ça, et ce qu’on perdrait par rapport à PHP/MySQL*

Intérêt grandissant pour Django.

Pour démarrer:

– djangoproject.com
– djangobook.com
– djangosnippets.org
– django-fr.org (fr)
– Bien débuter avec Django chez biologeek.com (fr)

Discussion:

– refaire WP avec Django? faisable, mais moyennement intéressant. Django, c’est pour quand on a des besoins spécifiques, faire un site “from scratch”.
– charge: java/tomcat, 6 machines — passé sous Django, une machine.
– possible d’utiliser Akismet avec un site développé avec Django

Similar Posts:

Google Shared Stuff: First Impressions [en]

Google Shared Stuff: First Impressions [en]

[fr] Google Shared Stuff, nouveau venu dans l'arène du social bookmarking. Pas convaincue qu'ils aient pour le moment quelque chose de plus à apporter que leurs concurrents déjà bien établis.

I’ve briefly tried [Google Shared Stuff](http://www.google.com/s2/sharing/stuff?user=107197629738478684722), and here are my first impressions. I’m one of those horrible people who always see what the problems are instead of what’s good, so I’ll just say as a preamble to the few gripes I’m raising here that overall, it looks neat, shiny, and it works roughly as it should.

#### Profile Photo

Your Shared Stuff -- Upload Picture

– **nice:** I can choose photos from various sources
– **not so nice:** “The photo you specify here will be used across all Google products and services which display your public photo, including Google Talk and Gmail.”

I already have a photo in my Gmail/Google Talk profile. Why can’t you use it? If I upload a photo here, is it going to overwrite it? Need more info, folks.

#### Private vs. Public

This is my shared stuff:

Your Shared Stuff -- As I See It

Shared stuff can be public or private. Above is the page as *I, the account owner* see it. Below is the page that the public sees:

Shared Stuff from Stephanie Booth -- As Everyone Sees It

See the missing link? (Not difficult, there are only two in total.) “Hah, you’ll say, you made the second link private! That’s why the public can’t see it!” Try again:

Trying - And Failing - To Share CTTS

The link was shared as “public”. This is obviously broken in some way, folks. Please fix it.

#### Email/Share Bookmarklet

The bookmarklet is nice, but nothing revolutionary:

Sharing Bookmarklets and Buttons

What about the sharing pane? It looks very much like the del.icio.us sharing pane, but more cluttered. The nice thing is that it lets you choose a photo to illustrate your share (like FaceBook does, for example):

Google Shared Stuff Email / Share Bookmarklet Pane

del.icio.us Sharing Pane

Besides being less cluttered, the del.icio.us pane has a huge advantage over the Google one: it’s a resizable window. Really really appreciated when a link you clicked (or a page opened by Skitch) uses that window for the new tab.

One interesting feature of this sharing pane is that it allows you to share to other social bookmarking services — not just Google’s. That’s nice. Open. No lock-in. But… isn’t it a bit pointless when I can access the del.icio.us bookmarking pane in just one click instead of three?

Google Shared Stuff Bookmarklet Pane

#### What I Wish For

**One-Click**

I’d like a one-click bookmarklet which works exactly like the “Share” button in Google Reader:

Google Reader Share Button

Clicking the “Share” button adds the post to the stream of my [Shared Items page/feed](http://www.google.com/reader/shared/09081754150283874260). Painless. I can easily add them to my sidebar:

Google Shared Items on CTTS

However, now that I’m using [the Google Reader “Next” bookmarklet](http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2007/06/doing-shuffle.html) more, I find that I’m in Google Reader less, so something like a “Share Bookmarklet” (Google Reader-style) would come in really handy.

The main point here is that to share something in Google Reader, I click once. With Shared Stuff or del.icio.us, I click at least twice.

**[Holes in Buckets!](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/02/13/please-make-holes-in-my-buckets/)**

So here we are. Again. Make all this stuff communicate, will ya? **When I share stuff in Google Reader, I’d love it to be pushed to my del.icio.us account automatically, with a preset tag or tags (“shareditem” for example).** It annoys me to have links I’ve saved [in del.icio.us](http://del.icio.us/steph) **and** in Shared Items (Google Reader). It’s not as bad as it was when you couldn’t search Google Reader, but still.

Am I going to add yet another list of “shared stuff” to my online ecosystem? That’s the question. Make that bookmarklet share to Google Reader Shared Items, and let me push all that to del.icio.us, and you’ll really have something that adds value for me.

Otherwise, I’m not sure where Shared Stuff will fit in my social bookmarking life.

Similar Posts:

Manuel de survie Twitter pour francophones [fr]

Manuel de survie Twitter pour francophones [fr]

[en] A survival guide to Twitter in French. If you're an English-speaker, head over to the Twitter support site or fan wiki.

**Mise à jour 03.2010:** Une grande partie de ces instructions (tout ce qui touche aux SMS, en particulier) n’est plus valable aujourd’hui. Par contre, les explications sur la nature de Twitter et son caractère public restent valables.

Cela fait des mois que je veux écrire ce « manuel de survie Twitter pour francophones ». Si vous débarquez (vous êtes pardonnables, ne vous en faites pas), filez vite lire [Twitter, c’est quoi ? Explications…](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/03/15/twitter-cest-quoi-explications/) ou écouter [la Capsule de Pain consacrée à Twitter](http://capsule.rsr.ch/site/?p=345). Si votre première réaction est de l’ordre de « c’est nul, ce truc ! », vous pouvez encore lire [Pas capté Twitter](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/05/14/pas-capte-twitter/).


En très simple, Twitter est un service qui vous invite à envoyer la réponse à la question “que faites-vous en ce moment?” à vos amis — par internet ou par SMS.

Vous êtes encore là ? Très bien. Voici **trois points importants à retenir** :

– avec Twitter, on ne choisit pas à qui on envoie ses messages ; ce sont les destinataires qui choisissent ce qu’ils veulent recevoir
– Twitter permet de faire la jointure entre le Web et le téléphone mobile ; le service y fonctionne de façon quasi identique
– Twitter ne devient véritablement intéressant que lorsque l’on est connecté à plusieurs personnes. N’hésitez donc pas à convaincre deux ou trois amis de s’inscrire en même temps que vous.

**En pratique**, comment est-ce que ça se passe ? Je vais vous présenter deux façons de vous inscrire (sur le Web et par SMS). Ensuite, je vous apprendrai les quelques commandes importantes pour pouvoir utiliser cet outil de façon agréable.

#### Inscription par SMS

Si vous avez reçu un SMS d’invitation de la part de Twitter, c’est sans doute que l’un de vos amis, déjà utilisateur du service, désire que vous le rejoignez.

Si vous n’avez pas reçu d’invitation, rien n’est perdu! Il vous suffit d’envoyer un SMS au +447624801423 (le numéro de Twitter) avec votre première mise à jour. Twitter vous répondra par un SMS demandant de choisir un nom.

Répondez au SMS de Twitter par un message contenant le nom d’utilisateur que vous aurez choisi. Vos amis utiliseront ce nom pour s’adresser à vous ou vous envoyer des messages directs. Gardez-le simple ! Les messages que vous envoyez à Twitter seront disponibles à l’adresse http://twitter.com/VotreNomD'Utilisateur (voir plus bas, « C’est public ! »).

Ajoutez également le numéro de Twitter à vos contacts.

**Attendez** le SMS de confirmation de Twitter. (Si vous êtes trop pressés, comme il m’est arrivé, votre deuxième message risque de dépasser le premier, et vous vous retrouverez avec un nom d’utilisateur faisant 15 km de long. On peut le changer par la suite, mais c’est embêtant.) Si le SMS n’arrive pas, je vous suggère de passer directement à l’étape d’inscription sur le Web, que vous devrez faire de toute façon.

Lorsque vous allez finaliser votre inscription sur le site Web et que vous utilisez déjà Twitter, on vous invite à [spécifier d’entrée votre numéro de téléphone](https://twitter.com/account/complete), qui sera ainsi automatiquement relié à votre compte.

Twitter par SMS

Attention, utiliser le format international de votre numéro de téléphone ! (Pour la Suisse, il commencera avec +41…) La suite de la procédure d’inscription à la même que si vous n’aviez pas encore commencé à utiliser votre téléphone avec Twitter.

#### Inscription sur le Web

*Si vous n’avez pas été invité par SMS, et que vous voulez faire tout ça sur le Web, il faut commencer ici.*

Bon, c’est en anglais, mais ce n’est vraiment pas sorcier. Direction [le formulaire d’inscription](https://twitter.com/signup) (si vous avez fait l’étape précédente, vous y êtes déjà) :

Twitter / Create an Account

Pas dur, non ? Vous pouvez maintenant vous lancer :

Twitter

Si le coeur vous en dit, [ajoutez une photo](http://twitter.com/account/picture) pour vous représenter et [quelques informations supplémentaires](http://twitter.com/account/settings).

#### Activer les SMS

*Attention, étape inutile si vous avez commencé à utiliser Twitter depuis votre téléphone mobile.*

Pour que tout soit bien, il nous faut ajouter le téléphone mobile. N’ayez crainte, Twitter ne fonctionne pas aux SMS surtaxés. En Suisse en tout cas, recevoir des SMS ne vous coûte rien, et envoyer un SMS à Twitter, même si le numéro de téléphone est anglais, coûte la même chose qu’envoyer un SMS en Suisse.

Twitter: ajouter téléphone

Twitter va vous demander de confirmer votre numéro de téléphone en envoyant un SMS avec un code. Cela évite que des personnes malintentionnées n’utilisent votre numéro de téléphone pour s’inscrire !

#### C’est public !

Prudence ! Rappelez-vous que les messages que vous envoyez avec Twitter apparaissent sur le Web : n’importe qui peut donc les lire. [Même avec un pseudonyme](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2006/02/18/anonymat-et-blog-intime/), quelqu’un pourrait un jour vous reconnaître. Tenez-en donc compte.

Vous avez bien entendu la possibilité de protéger vos messages en cochant la case « Protect my updates » sur la [page des réglages](http://twitter.com/account/settings). Ils ne seront visibles qu’aux personnes qui décident de vous suivre, ce que n’importe qui peut faire sans demander votre autorisation, même si vous avez la possibilité de bloquer certaines personnes après coup et à qui vous aurez donné votre autorisation.

Cela ne rend pas vos messages privés, mais vous donne un peu de discrétion. Gardez à l’esprit que vos mises à jour vont apparaître sur les pages de ceux qui vous suivent, et qu’il est vite fait d’oublier que quelque chose est privé. Une saisie d’écran, c’est si facile!

Comme toujours, donc, les choses « privées » que l’on ne désire pas mettre sous les yeux de tout le monde (inconnus, mais surtout amis) ne devraient pas se mettre sur Internet, sauf dans un espace protégé par un bon mot de passe (et encore…)

#### Inviter des amis

Plus on est de fous, plus on rit, et plus on est d’amis, plus Twitter montre sa valeur. Inviter donc quelques amis à vous rejoindre, surtout s’ils se connaissent ! Envoyez-leur aussi l’adresse de ce guide de survie pour leur faciliter la tâche.

La formule magique, c’est « invite +417xxxxxxxx », sans les guillemets et en remplaçant le numéro de téléphone par celui de votre ami bien entendu, que vous pouvez envoyer par SMS à Twitter ou bien [directement par le Web](http://twitter.com/home).

Ils recevront donc un SMS d’invitation de la part de Twitter, auquel ils pourront répondre comme décrit plus haut.

#### Suivre des personnes déjà inscrites

Si vous connaissez des personnes qui sont déjà chez Twitter, demandez-leur leur nom d’utilisateur. Vous pouvez les ajouter soit en envoyant le message « on nomd’utilisateur » à Twitter, soit en vous rendant sur leur page Twitter (http://twitter.com/nomd’utilisateur) et en cliquant sur le petit bouton « Follow » qui se trouve au-dessous de leur nom :

Twitter -- Follow

Ensuite, cliquer sur le bouton « on » pour activer la réception des messages de cette personne par SMS :

Twitter, SMS on

En cherchant, vous pourrez trouver les [annonces officielles Twitter](http://twitter.com/twitter) ainsi que les comptes de la joyeuse équipe qui fabrique ce merveilleux outil : [biz](http://twitter.com/biz), [ev](http://twitter.com/ev), [jack](http://twitter.com/jack), [blaine](http://twitter.com/blaine), [britt](http://twitter.com/britt)… Moi, je suis [par ici](http://twitter.com/stephtara)…

#### Gérer ces satanés SMS

Suivant combien de personnes vous décidez de suivre, vous courez le risque de vous retrouver assez rapidement inondé de SMS — particulièrement si vous comptez parmi vos amis des irrépressibles bavards [comme moi](http://twitter.com/stephtara). En plus, on a tous des seuils de tolérance aux SMS différents.

Heureusement, Twitter nous donne le moyen de gérer tout ça. Ce qu’il faut comprendre, c’est qu’il y a une différence entre les personnes auxquelles vous êtes abonnées et les personnes dont vous recevez les notifications.

– Les messages des personnes auxquelles vous êtes abonnées apparaissent sur votre [page d’accueil](http://twitter.com/home).
– Les messages des personnes dont vous recevez les notifications arrivent sur votre téléphone portable.

Il est donc possible de « suivre » ou autrement dit, d’être abonné aux messages de nombreuses personnes, et de garder ainsi un oeil plus ou moins distrait sur leur quotidien ou leurs activités, sans être pour autant noyé sous les SMS. Il est possible de :

– désactiver les notifications par SMS : « off »
– réactiver les notifications par SMS : « on »
– désactiver les SMS de telle heure à telle heure (pendant la nuit par exemple)

De plus, on peut choisir de ne recevoir des notifications que pour certaines personnes. Par exemple, je suis abonnée à près de 200 personnes sur Twitter, mais je ne reçois sur mon téléphone portable que les notifications d’une toute petite dizaine de personnes proches.

On peut donc contrôler, personne par personne, si on veut recevoir leurs notifications par SMS :

– pour arrêter de recevoir les notifications par SMS d’une certaine personne (par exemple quelqu’un qui parle trop !) : « off nomd’utilisateur »
– pour commencer à recevoir les notifications par SMS d’une personne (par exemple quelqu’un dont on a auparavant désactivé les notifications mais que l’on désire de nouveau ajouter, au quelqu’un dont on ne reçoit pas habituellement les notifications mais qu’on veut recevoir sur son téléphone portable pour une raison ou pour une autre en ce moment) : « on nomd’utilisateur »

On peut aussi faire ses réglages depuis le Web :

Twitter : following detail

Un petit truc : si vous êtes en train de recevoir les notifications pour beaucoup de personnes, cela peut être fastidieux d’aller les désactiver une à une. La commande « leave all » permet de faire le nettoyage par le vide et de désactiver les notifications de tout le monde. Vous pouvez ensuite ajouter manuellement les quelques personnes dont vous désirez recevoir les notifications par SMS.

Si vous ne recevez pas les notifications d’une personne, mais que vous désirez tout de même recevoir par SMS le dernier message qu’elle a envoyé à Twitter : « get nomd’utilisateur ».

#### Web, SMS… Et quoi d’autre ?

Que vous utilisiez Mac ou Windows, il y a un petit programme très sympathique que vous pouvez installer (c’est gratuit !) et qui vous donnera directement accès aux messages Twitter des gens auxquels vous êtes abonnés, sans que vous ayez à vous embêter à aller sur leur site Web à chaque fois. Il ressemble un peu aux programmes d’« instant messaging », comme MSN par exemple.

– pour Mac : [Twitterrific](http://iconfactory.com/software/twitterrific)
– pour Windows : [Twitteroo](http://rareedge.com/twitteroo/)

#### Et la messagerie instantanée ?

Oui… On peut aussi choisir de recevoir les messages Twitter par messagerie instantanée (Jabber, Google Talk). À mon avis, ce n’est intéressant que si vous recevez la messagerie instantanée sur votre téléphone portable, et si ça vous coûte moins cher que des SMS. En Suisse, ce n’est pas encore vraiment le cas.

Sur l’ordinateur, je dirais que c’est plus dangereux qu’autre chose, surtout si les gens que vous suivez sur Twitter sont des gens avec qui vous chattez : vous risquez de ne pas réaliser que le message vient via Twitter, et d’y répondre comme si vous chattiez (en privé !) avec votre ami. Du coup, risque d’envoyer à toutes les personnes qui sont abonnées à vos messages Twitter un message que vous ne destiniez qu’à une seule personne… Ça peut être embêtant !

En plus, si votre client de messagerie instantanée est réglé pour envoyer une auto-réponse, ces auto-réponses risquent d’être envoyées comme messages Twitter… Pas forcément très embêtant, mais ce n’est pas très classe !

#### Les messages directs

Vous pouvez envoyer à une personne qui vous suit sur Twitter un message direct (privé) : « d nomd’utilisateur texte de votre message ». Attention, vous ne savez pas si cette personne va recevoir votre message sur son téléphone portable ou non !

#### D’autres questions ?

D’autres questions, quelque chose qui n’est pas clair ? Laissez un mot dans les commentaires je me ferai un plaisir d’y répondre.

Similar Posts:

We Need Structured Portable Social Networks (SPSN) [en]

We Need Structured Portable Social Networks (SPSN) [en]

[fr] Nous avons besoin de réseaux sociaux que l'on peut importer/exporter d'un outil/service à l'autre. Nous avons également besoin de pouvoir structurer ces réseaux sociaux qui contiennent souvent un nombre important de personnes. Nous avons besoin de réseaux sociaux portables structurés.

Christophe Ducamp s'est lancé dans une traduction de cet article. Allez donner un coup de main ou bien en profiter, selon vos compétences! Je n'ai pas lu cette traduction, mais je suis certaine qu'elle est utile. Merci Christophe!

Scrolling through my “trash” e-mail address to report spam, I spotted (quite by chance, I have to say) a nice e-mail from Barney, who works at [Lijit](http://www.lijit.com/). Barney asked me if I had any feedback, [which I’ll give in my next post](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/08/16/lijit-feedback/), because I need to digress a bit here.

Lijit is a really fun and smart search tool which allows to [search through a person’s complete online presence](http://www.lijit.com/users/steph “See mine.”), a remedy, in a way, to the increasing [fragmentation of online identity](http://twitter.com/stephtara/statuses/200579442) that’s bothering me so much these days. Actually, it was already bothering me quite a few months ago, when I wrote [Please Make Holes in My Buckets](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/02/13/please-make-holes-in-my-buckets/):

>So, here’s a hole in the buckets that I really like: I’ve seen this in many services, but the first time I saw it was on Myspace. “Let us peek in your GMail contacts, and we’ll tell you who already has an account — and let you invite the others.” When I saw that, it scared me (”OMG! Myspace sticking its nose in my e-mail!”) but I also found it really exciting. Now, it would be even better if I could say “import friends and family from Flickr” or “let me choose amongst my IM buddies”, but it’s a good start. Yes, there’s a danger: no, I don’t want to spam invitations to your service to the 450 unknown adresses you found in my contacts, thankyouverymuch. Plaxo is a way to do this (I’ve seen it criticised but I can’t precisely remember why). Facebook does it, which means that within 2 minutes you can already have friends in the network. Twitter doesn’t, which means you have to painstakingly go through your friends of friends lists to get started. I think coComment and any “friend-powered” service should allow us to import contacts like that by now. And yes, sure, privacy issues.

One thing the 2.0 world needs urgently is a way to abstract (to some extent) the social network users create for themselves from the particular *service* it is linked to. **We need portable social networks.** More than that, actually, we need **structured portable social networks** (SPSNs). I’ve already written that being able to give one’s “contact list” a structure (through “contact groups” or “buddy groups”) is vital if we want to manage privacy efficiently (in my horrendously long but — from my point of view of course — really important post “[Groups, Groupings, and Taming My Buddy List. And Twitter.](http://climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/05/04/groups-groupings-and-taming-my-buddy-list-and-twitter/)”):

> I personally think that it is also the key to managing many privacy issues intelligently. How do I organise the people in my world? Well, of course, it’s fuzzy, shifting, changing. But if I look at my IM buddy list, I might notice that I have classified the people on it to some point: I might have “close friends”, “co-workers”, “blog friends”, “offline friends”, “IRC friends”, “girlfriends”, “ex-clients”, “boring stalkers”, “other people”, “tech support”… I might not want to make public which groups my buddies belong to, or worse, let them know (especially if I’ve put them in “boring stalkers” or “tech support” and suspect that they might have placed me in “best friends” or “love interests”… yes, human relationships can be complicated…)

> Flickr offers a half-baked version of this. […]

> A more useful way to let a user organise his contacts is simply to let him tag them. Xing does that. Unfortunately, it does not allow one to do much with the contact groups thus defined, besides displaying contacts by tag […].

In fact, we need structured social networks not only to deal with privacy issues, but also (and it’s related, if you think of it) to deal with social network fatigue that seems to be hitting many of us. I actually have been holding off writing a rather detailed post in response to [danah](http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/)’s post explaining that [Facebook is loosing its context for her](http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/archives/2007/08/10/loss_of_context.html) — something that, in my words, I would describe as “Facebook is becoming impossible to manage in a way that makes sense with my life and relationships.” Here’s what she says:

> Le sigh. I lost control over my Facebook tonight. Or rather, the context got destroyed. For months, I’ve been ignoring most friend requests. Tonight, I gave up and accepted most of them. I have been facing the precise dilemma that I write about in my articles: what constitutes a “friend”? Where’s the line? For Facebook, I had been only accepting friend requests from people that I went to school with and folks who have socialized at my house. But what about people that I enjoy talking with at conferences? What about people who so kindly read and comment on this blog? What about people I respect? What about people who appreciate my research but whom I have not yet met? I started feeling guilty as people poked me and emailed me to ask why I hadn’t accepted their friend request. My personal boundaries didn’t matter – my act of ignorance was deemed rude by those that didn’t share my social expectations.

danah boyd, loss of context for me on Facebook

I think that what danah is expressing here is one possible explanation to why people are first really excited about new social networking sites/services/tools/whatevers (YASNs) and then abandon them: at one point, or “contact list” becomes unmanageable. At the beginning, not everybody is on the YASN: just us geeky early adopters — and at the beginning, just a few of us. We have a dozen contacts or so. Then it grows: 30, 50, 60… We’re highly connected people. Like danah, many of us are somewhat public figures. From “friends of our heart”, we start getting requests from **people who are part of our network but don’t fit in *segment* we want to reserve this YASN to**. We start refusing requests, and then give in, and then a lot of the value the YASN could have for us is lost.

Unless YASNs offer us an easy way to structure our social network, this is going to happen over and over and over again. For the moment, [Pownce](http://pownce.com) and [Viddler](http://viddler.com) allow me to structure my social network. A lot of work still needs to be done in the interface department for this kind of feature. (Yes, [Twitter](http://twitter.com), I’m looking at you. You said “soon”.)

So, to summarize, we need **tools and services** which make our **social networks**

– **portable**: so that we can import and export our relationships to other people from one service to another
– **structured**: so that we can manage the huge number of relationships, of varying and very personal degrees of intimacy, that highly connected online people have.

**Update, an hour or so later:** [Kevin Marks](http://epeus.blogspot.com) points me to [social network portability](http://microformats.org/wiki/social-network-portability) on the microformats wiki. Yeah, should have done my homework, but remember, this post started out as a quick reply to an e-mail. Anyway, this is good. There is hope.

Similar Posts: