Real-Time is Burying History on the Web

[fr] Notre obsession pour le temps présent en ligne et la vitesse handicape grandement nos outils de recherche quand il s'agit d'explorer notre passé numérique. A lire, l'article de Suw Sacrificing Web History on the Alter of Instant, un compte-rendu consternant de l'état lamentable de nos outils de recherche pour la passé récent (l'éruption du volcan Eyjafjöll, en l'occurrence).

Plus près du commun des mortels peut-être que ces considérations d'historiens du web: Twitter ne nous donne accès qu'à nos 3000 tweets les plus récents. Les autres sont là, archivés, même en ligne si on connaît leur URL -- mais inaccessibles même à leur producteur.

I am somebody who believes that history is an extraordinarily important asset in trying to understand our present. Unfortunately, when we are too focused on the future, and innovation, and moving ahead, it’s very easily to neglect history.

I’ve seen it as a characteristic of developing countries (sweeping generalization here, stop me if I’m wrong), with the thoughtless chopping down of centenarian trees and bulldozing of historical monuments in Bangalore. What’s important is where we’re going — we don’t really care about where we came from, and in some cases, would rather forget.

And we’re seeing it now in the hyper-technological cutting-edge world of the internet, where web history is being sacrificed on the altar of instant (do read Suw Charman‘s excellent post and then come back here).

A year and a bit ago, the theme of LeWeb’09 in Paris was “Real-Time Web”, and indeed, everybody was a-buzz with everything real-time. So much so that I had to give that year’s official bloggers a little wake-up call (I blogged it later) a day before the conference, because I was hearing increasingly worrisome comments (to my “official bloggers’ mom” ears) along the lines of “well, I actually don’t think I’ll blog much this year, I’ll mainly be tweeting”. I was interviewed about something along the lines of “curating the real-time stream” by my friend Cathy Brooks (there’s a priceless moment in that video, watch it), and overall, everything was about now, now, now, now now nownownownownownow.

I’m tired of real-time.

It feels to me as if we’re driving with our nose in the steering-wheel, never stopping long enough to look behind us and see what road we’re on and where it’s really heading. I’ve noted over the last year or so that a lot of our content is migrating into these real-time flowy presency streamy services, and that some of the precious tools we had to make sense of our online publications are all but dead, like Technorati.

But link rot aside, it’s all still there online. And that makes it all the more frustrating to know that we just don’t have a way of getting to it in a useful way, as Suw describes very well in her article. In response, Reg Chua points out that search is skewed towards speed and the present — a perfect corollary to our obsession with real-time and progress.

My tweets from day 1 (December 8, 2006 with a lot of enthusiasm) are still online somewhere. Here’s the oldest one I could lay my hands on (the podcast in question was Fresh Lime Soda), thanks to the wayback machine (if you go down that alley, note how we get a peek at what early tweeting was like in pre-hashtag times). It makes it all the more maddening that they are impossible to access if I don’t have a link to them. Twitter has them, they’re there, but they’re not organized in a way that makes them of any use.

Sidenote: this blog post is moving from “lack of access to general online history” to “lack of access to personal online history”, which is a subset of the problem.

Within that “personal online history” subset of the problem, let me state that I find it a disgrace that Twitter will not even let its users download a copy of their own data in the service, barring the last 3000 tweets.

I understand the need to restrict access to the huge number of tweets in the database for general use. I get that. But I don’t get why I should not be able to do a one-time download of what I put in the service.

I hate the expression data theft because when you take data, you always leave a copy somewhere (and theft removes the copy), but in this case, this is what it feels like. Twitter has my data and can do stuff with it, and I can’t. That just doesn’t feel right. (And don’t wave the “Twitter is free, don’t complain” argument in my face: just like Suw, I would be more than ready to pay for Twitter as a service, but they won’t let me.)

Away from Twitter and back to our obsession with real-time and what it is doing to our history: where are the online historians? who is going to build the tools we need to dig through the tremendous wealth of data online? the buzzword of 2011 seems to be “curator”: well, we don’t just need curators to avoid getting knocked over by the firehose of the real-time web — we also need curators (preferably machines) to help us organise and sort through our online history.

 

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This entry was posted in Thinking, Tools and tagged history, real-time, Research, search, tools, twitter, web. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Real-Time is Burying History on the Web

  1. I have decided to keep my Twitter archives handy on my own blog with FeedWordpress and Clean Twitter Feed (I like that it removes the @username – I know who I am).

    Then, I class them in a particular category that I hide from my homepage with Advanced Category Excluder, it’s neater that way.

    I get that it won’t give you all your archives back, but from now on you could have easy access, with the WordPress search feature, to all of your new tweets, until you can get your archive back (if ever).

  2. I’m actually using Backupify, and have been doing so for a while (I’m not sure how usable their archives are, though). But as I’m sure you’ve understood, not having access to my personal tweets is the smaller, more annoying for me symptom of a much larger issue: the disconnection from our past, through our broken tools.

  3. Joe says:

    Hi Stephanie

    An interesting post and well written, thanks. Personally speaking, one of my problems in life is I can’t stop looking to the past. Take care. Joe

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